More Videos

Are flamingos Florida natives? 1:09

Are flamingos Florida natives?

See the moment when Hilton Head fishing crew catches 16-foot great white shark 0:45

See the moment when Hilton Head fishing crew catches 16-foot great white shark

Giant gator takes a stroll on Manatee County golf course 0:13

Giant gator takes a stroll on Manatee County golf course

Video of men harassing wildlife leads to arrest 4:40

Video of men harassing wildlife leads to arrest

Every American is vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change, federal report finds 4:14

Every American is vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change, federal report finds

Miami-Dade tries new form of mosquito control 1:43

Miami-Dade tries new form of mosquito control

Secrets of a snake's belly crawl 1:59

Secrets of a snake's belly crawl

Misael Soto - Flood relief 3:08

Misael Soto - Flood relief

'Backlog for repairs and hurricane damage taking a toll on Everglades National Park' 2:54

"Backlog for repairs and hurricane damage taking a toll on Everglades National Park"

Baby turtles stunned by cold snap returned to the wild 0:23

Baby turtles stunned by cold snap returned to the wild

Jesse Kennon, owner of Coopertown Airboats Tours, speaks about increased water levels south of Tamiami Trail in the Everglades. Record rain this winter has pushed South Florida into emergency mode: with Lake Okeechobee nearly full, water managers have begun dumping water into rivers to the east and west. To ease pressure on a massive 1,000-acre water conservation area to the south that usually holds water but is full from local run-off, managers have begun sending water into the L-29 along the Tamiami Trail and out the Shark River Slough. Walter Michot wmichot@miamiherald.com
Jesse Kennon, owner of Coopertown Airboats Tours, speaks about increased water levels south of Tamiami Trail in the Everglades. Record rain this winter has pushed South Florida into emergency mode: with Lake Okeechobee nearly full, water managers have begun dumping water into rivers to the east and west. To ease pressure on a massive 1,000-acre water conservation area to the south that usually holds water but is full from local run-off, managers have begun sending water into the L-29 along the Tamiami Trail and out the Shark River Slough. Walter Michot wmichot@miamiherald.com

South Florida water crisis has silver lining: more water for the southern ‘Glades

February 18, 2016 08:53 PM

More Videos

Are flamingos Florida natives? 1:09

Are flamingos Florida natives?

See the moment when Hilton Head fishing crew catches 16-foot great white shark 0:45

See the moment when Hilton Head fishing crew catches 16-foot great white shark

Giant gator takes a stroll on Manatee County golf course 0:13

Giant gator takes a stroll on Manatee County golf course

Video of men harassing wildlife leads to arrest 4:40

Video of men harassing wildlife leads to arrest

Every American is vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change, federal report finds 4:14

Every American is vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change, federal report finds

Miami-Dade tries new form of mosquito control 1:43

Miami-Dade tries new form of mosquito control

Secrets of a snake's belly crawl 1:59

Secrets of a snake's belly crawl

Misael Soto - Flood relief 3:08

Misael Soto - Flood relief

'Backlog for repairs and hurricane damage taking a toll on Everglades National Park' 2:54

"Backlog for repairs and hurricane damage taking a toll on Everglades National Park"

Baby turtles stunned by cold snap returned to the wild 0:23

Baby turtles stunned by cold snap returned to the wild