On Thursday, the South Florida Water Management District announced that farmers and ranchers had once again reduced the amount of phosphorus polluting the Everglades and fueling the growth of algae and cattails that can choke native marshes. However, water still lremains too dirty to quench the southern Everglades where a severe draught has caused salinity in Florida Bay to rise.
On Thursday, the South Florida Water Management District announced that farmers and ranchers had once again reduced the amount of phosphorus polluting the Everglades and fueling the growth of algae and cattails that can choke native marshes. However, water still lremains too dirty to quench the southern Everglades where a severe draught has caused salinity in Florida Bay to rise. Tim Chapman Miami Herald Staff
On Thursday, the South Florida Water Management District announced that farmers and ranchers had once again reduced the amount of phosphorus polluting the Everglades and fueling the growth of algae and cattails that can choke native marshes. However, water still lremains too dirty to quench the southern Everglades where a severe draught has caused salinity in Florida Bay to rise. Tim Chapman Miami Herald Staff

Farm pollution down but not enough to quench the Everglades

August 13, 2015 06:32 PM

UPDATED August 14, 2015 10:30 AM

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