Dirty water released from Lake Okeechobee slimed the Treasure Coast with toxic algae in June 2016. Florida lawmakers are now debating whether to speed up construction of a massive South Florida reservoir to store the water. Sugar growers and farmers oppose it. On Tuesday, the Everglades Foundation released a said improved water quality could increase property values east and west of the lake by $20 billion.
Dirty water released from Lake Okeechobee slimed the Treasure Coast with toxic algae in June 2016. Florida lawmakers are now debating whether to speed up construction of a massive South Florida reservoir to store the water. Sugar growers and farmers oppose it. On Tuesday, the Everglades Foundation released a said improved water quality could increase property values east and west of the lake by $20 billion. Richard Graulich AP
Dirty water released from Lake Okeechobee slimed the Treasure Coast with toxic algae in June 2016. Florida lawmakers are now debating whether to speed up construction of a massive South Florida reservoir to store the water. Sugar growers and farmers oppose it. On Tuesday, the Everglades Foundation released a said improved water quality could increase property values east and west of the lake by $20 billion. Richard Graulich AP

Environmentalists vs. farmers: Dueling reports complicate Florida reservoir debate

February 28, 2017 7:53 PM

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