St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic School seventh-graders Rafael de la Torre, left, Sophia Corrales, center, and Brooke Filliben, right, help carry their "Future Cities" project entry into the judging room on Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 at the Florida International University Engineering Center in Miami. The South Miami school's team came in second in the South Florida Region arm of the national engineering competition for middle schoolers. Projects were designed for the theme "Feeding Future Cities." The challenge: to design a city that can sustain life for at least one growing season with a budget of $100. The first-place winners from each qualifying regional competition can compete in the Future City Competition National Finals in Washington, D.C., Feb. 15-18, 2015 in preparation of Engineers Week.
St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic School seventh-graders Rafael de la Torre, left, Sophia Corrales, center, and Brooke Filliben, right, help carry their "Future Cities" project entry into the judging room on Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 at the Florida International University Engineering Center in Miami. The South Miami school's team came in second in the South Florida Region arm of the national engineering competition for middle schoolers. Projects were designed for the theme "Feeding Future Cities." The challenge: to design a city that can sustain life for at least one growing season with a budget of $100. The first-place winners from each qualifying regional competition can compete in the Future City Competition National Finals in Washington, D.C., Feb. 15-18, 2015 in preparation of Engineers Week. MARSHA HALPER MIAMI HERALD STAFF
St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic School seventh-graders Rafael de la Torre, left, Sophia Corrales, center, and Brooke Filliben, right, help carry their "Future Cities" project entry into the judging room on Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 at the Florida International University Engineering Center in Miami. The South Miami school's team came in second in the South Florida Region arm of the national engineering competition for middle schoolers. Projects were designed for the theme "Feeding Future Cities." The challenge: to design a city that can sustain life for at least one growing season with a budget of $100. The first-place winners from each qualifying regional competition can compete in the Future City Competition National Finals in Washington, D.C., Feb. 15-18, 2015 in preparation of Engineers Week. MARSHA HALPER MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Middle school students compete to build and feed the city of the future

January 17, 2015 11:01 PM

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