‘Frozen’ summer camps in Miami Shores, South Florida are hot with kids who love the movie

The Miami Shores Community opened a two-week summer camp for ‘Frozen’ fanatics, joining a growing list of camps centered around the popular Disney flick.

06/26/2014 5:30 PM

06/26/2014 8:50 PM

Hands on their hips in their mismatched pink clothes, the girls belted out the words to the songs they had sung in the shower, on their way to and from camp, and at themed birthday parties.

These 7-to-12-year-olds can’t seem to let go of one of the most popular movies of the year, Frozen.

With summer camps catering to their Frozen fixation, their parents might have to keep hearing their high-pitched rendition of the movie’s songs until the next Disney movie comes along. Or they will just have to sing along.

The Miami Shores Community Center opened a two-week summer camp for Frozen fanatics on June 16. More than 80 students ages 4 to 12 arrived on the first day with their Frozen T-shirts, lunchboxes and backpacks.

The camp appeared to be one of the hottest tickets in town for children looking to have their fantasies come to life.

Parents rushed to register their kids for the camp, said Joanne Mundy, Frozen camp lead instructor.

The movie tells the tale of a snow queen, Elsa, and her sister, Anna, who learn the importance of sisterhood with a comedic talking snowman, Olaf, following them along on their journey.

After seeing the movie, Mundy — or Miss Frozen, as her campers call her — knew she had to create a camp where kids could relive the movie.

“It’s one of the very best movies,” she said. Miss Frozen, who owns JMundy Events Corp., offers her camps at the Miami Shores Community Center.

Mundy and her camp staffers are helping the children prepare for their big Frozen musical number Friday.

The children have drawn Elsa and Olaf pictures, made construction paper snowflakes, created cardboard props and rehearsed the songs and dances for the performance.

Originally, the camp held auditions for each of the movie characters.

But because “there were so many tears, we decided to make it a musical so every single child could be Anna and Elsa,” Mundy said.

While campers practiced the choreographed dances for the musical, 9-year-old Estella Dunham was working on selecting the songs for the performance.

“ I’ve seen the movie Frozen 11 times,” Estella said.

For some of the campers, the princesses are simply supporting actors in the movie.

“Olaf is my favorite,” said Brooke Mundy, 11. “ He’s funny, cute and goofy like me.”

Frozen is hot at summer camps around Florida. The Orlando Repertory Theatre in partnership with UCF has a musical theater camp dedicated to the movie.

The camp, which runs July 28-Aug. 1, will explore the hit movie songs, including Let it Go, In Summer and Do You Want To Build A Snowman?

While the kids may not understand now, the movie has a great storyline, said Ashley Willsey, marketing manager of the Orlando Repertory Theatre.

“Deep down it really does have some great lessons and messages about being who you are and protecting the people you care about,” she said.

Even Florida Girl Scout and gymnastic camps are trying to include the movie in their camp activities. Boss Chick Minis: Summer Dance Camp for Girls in Miami also will host a Frozen-inspired choreography routine for their final performance in July.

After coming out late 2013, Frozen made $1.2 billion, becoming the fifth-highest grossing film of all time. And after seeing the movie multiple times, kids could not wait to get their hands on everything Frozen, causing a shortage in movie toys at Disney stores.

Lauren Cortinas’ daughter, Lia, 4, is taking part in the Miami Shores camp.

Lia already has amassed a Frozen collection since first seeing the movie.

Her mom has bought her the soundtrack, DVD, dolls and light-up Elsa shoes.

At home, Lia creates makeshift Elsa costumes by using a fleece blanket as a cape and her mom’s black heels.

But her mom would rather Lia look up to Anna instead.

“Honestly Anna is my favorite, she’s kind of in rare Disney form the most imperfect princess,” Cortinas said. “She really embodies many qualities we would love for our girls to have, when they grow into adults.”

While the mother and daughter can’t agree on which princess is the best, one thing they can agree on is their enthusiasm for the final performance on Friday.

“I’m excited to see the final product at the end,” she said

.

Join the Discussion

Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Terms of Service