A Panama Canal tugboat captain maneuvers a miniature tugboat as he trains at the scale model maneuvering training center on the outskirts of Panama City. Under the new system, tugboat captains will have to engage in tricky maneuvers in a confined space inside the locks themselves, trying to keep bulky post-Panamax ships from banging into the walls or even crushing the tugs if they lose control.
A Panama Canal tugboat captain maneuvers a miniature tugboat as he trains at the scale model maneuvering training center on the outskirts of Panama City. Under the new system, tugboat captains will have to engage in tricky maneuvers in a confined space inside the locks themselves, trying to keep bulky post-Panamax ships from banging into the walls or even crushing the tugs if they lose control. Arnulfo Franco AP
A Panama Canal tugboat captain maneuvers a miniature tugboat as he trains at the scale model maneuvering training center on the outskirts of Panama City. Under the new system, tugboat captains will have to engage in tricky maneuvers in a confined space inside the locks themselves, trying to keep bulky post-Panamax ships from banging into the walls or even crushing the tugs if they lose control. Arnulfo Franco AP

How tiny ships could help prevent crashes on the Panama Canal

June 22, 2016 3:33 PM

More Videos

  • A look at the new Panama Canal lock system

    The largest infrastructure project since the waterway’s original construction, the Panama Canal Expansion Program will create a new lane of traffic along the Canal through the construction of a new set of locks, increasing the waterway’s capacity. The new locks will have three chambers, water-saving basins, lateral filling and emptying system and rolling gates.