A couple of youths cycle past the U.S yacht Still Waters, moored at the Hemingway Marina in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015. “The elimination of restrictions on nautical tourism by the U.S. government appears as if it will happen over the short term,” said Jose Luis Perello, a tourism professor at the University of Havana. “That won’t just open the doors to U.S. yachters and other tourists, but (also) to many from other countries and yacht clubs.”
A couple of youths cycle past the U.S yacht Still Waters, moored at the Hemingway Marina in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015. “The elimination of restrictions on nautical tourism by the U.S. government appears as if it will happen over the short term,” said Jose Luis Perello, a tourism professor at the University of Havana. “That won’t just open the doors to U.S. yachters and other tourists, but (also) to many from other countries and yacht clubs.” Desmond Boylan AP
A couple of youths cycle past the U.S yacht Still Waters, moored at the Hemingway Marina in Havana, Cuba, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015. “The elimination of restrictions on nautical tourism by the U.S. government appears as if it will happen over the short term,” said Jose Luis Perello, a tourism professor at the University of Havana. “That won’t just open the doors to U.S. yachters and other tourists, but (also) to many from other countries and yacht clubs.” Desmond Boylan AP

Cuba plans boating boom as US luxury ships head to Havana

August 07, 2015 11:34 AM

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