(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

PROJECTS PENDING

$940,000: 1817 NW 69th St.

The Miami-Dade Housing Agency loaned developer Reynaldo Diaz, of the Infill Development Company, $940,000 in 2002 to build affordable, single-family houses. To date, almost every lot is still vacant and Diaz has yet to repay the loan, now in default, or the $90,240 in outstanding interest payments.

(Al Diaz/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$600,000: 850 SW 13 Street

In 2003, the Housing Agency awarded Merritt Housing $600,000 to build 159 units. But the contract was cancelled a year later with nothing built.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$1 million: 2225 NW 80th St.

The Housing Agency in 2002 loaned developer Octavio Castellanos, of Personal Paradise Developers, $1 million to build about 20 affordable, single-family homes. Four years later, some of the houses have still not been built and the lots are vacant. The developer owes the Housing Agency $447,000 plus interest.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$2 million: 8800 SW 8th St.

In 2002, the Housing Agency funnelled $2 million to MDHA Development Corp. for the development of an affordable housing project for the elderly. Four years later, nothing has been built.

(Raul Rubiera/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$764,000: NW 85th St. and NW 5th Ave.

In 2002, the Miami-Dade Housing Agency paid developer Oscar Rivero $764,000 for the construction of 24 townhouses for the poor. No homes were ever built, and the lot has become a neighborhood dumping ground. The Housing Agency canceled the project, but Rivero has not returned the money.

(Al Diaz/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$1 million: 1680 NW 39th St.

The Housing Agency paid the Allapattah Business Develop-ment Authority $1 million to finance the construction of 30 homes for the low-income. The group has repeatedly post-poned construction due dates.

(Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$3 million: 940 SW 29th St.

In 2001, Miami-Dade ccommissioners opted to lease land at Smathers Plaza public housing to the MDHA Development Corp. and later awarded the group $3 million. The plan was to develop and operate a 105-unit assisted-living facility for low-income elderly. But the project has stalled for years, with only the existing Smathers Plaza standing on the site.

(Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$500,000: 1497 W. Flagler St.

The Miami-Dade Housing Agency approved a total of $500,000 to the Model Housing Cooperative to build the 32-unit Villas Dr. Godnoy. The project was supposed to be done by 2003. To date, it's still only 75 percent complete.

(Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$1 million: 1800 SW 8th St.

Troubled developer Oscar Rivero was awarded $1 million in 2006 to build 54 units called 1800 Condos. He got the money even though two of his previous affordable housing projects died, costing taxpayers $1.6 million. Earlier this year, Rivero relinquished the $1 million. The lot is still empty.

(Al Diaz/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$1 million: 500 NW 36 St.

The Housing Agency paid Pinnacle Housing $1 million to build the 179-unit Los Suenos Apartments. The developer has post-poned construction deadlines and the project is months behind schedule.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$1 million: 240 N. Miami Ave.

In 2005, the Housing Agency awarded $1 million to Miami Downtown Developers, a team that includes Alben Duffie. His wife is an administrator at the Housing Agency, and Duffie runs a nonprofit group that was advanced millions of dollars for affordable housing projects.The Housing Agency recouped the money in April. Nothing was ever built.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$2 million: 2415 NW 16th Rd.

The Housing Agency gave Enterprise Community Develop-ment Corporation $2 million beginning in 2003 to build River Run South Apartments with 174 units. Three years later, the building is still only 80 percent complete.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$1 million: 5896 SW 68th St.

In 2005, the Housing Agency awarded developer Oscar Rivero $1 million for a proposed 46-unit housing complex in South Miami. Rivero got the money even though he had been paid $1.6 million already for two other affordable housing projects that are now dead. So far, nothing has been built. The Housing Agency earlier this year recouped the $1 million.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$940,000: 1882 NW 70th St.

The Housing Agency loaned developer Reynaldo Diaz, with the Infill Development Group, $940,000 in 2002 to build sev-eral dozen houses on vacant inner-city lots. Four years later, most of the lots are still vacant and Diaz has yet to repay the Housing Agency loan, which is in default. On NW 70th Street, homeowners use the vacant lot to park their cars.

(Carl Juste/Miami Herald) Part 1 photos

$816,000: 2300 NW 7th St.

Developer Oscar Rivero pocketed $816,000 from the Housing Agency to build 54 homes for the poor. But nothing was ever built. Now, the lot is used as a parking lot; a construction com-pany uses it to hose down cement trucks. Rivero has never repaid the money.