In this image released by NBC News, former NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal appears on the “Today’’ show during an interview with co-host Matt Lauer, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in New York. Dolezal, who resigned as head of a NAACP chapter after her parents said she is white, said Tuesday that she started identifying as black around age 5, when she drew self-portraits with a brown crayon, and "takes exception" to the contention that she tried to deceive people. Asked by Matt Lauer if she is an "an African-American woman," Dolezal said: "I identify as black."
In this image released by NBC News, former NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal appears on the “Today’’ show during an interview with co-host Matt Lauer, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in New York. Dolezal, who resigned as head of a NAACP chapter after her parents said she is white, said Tuesday that she started identifying as black around age 5, when she drew self-portraits with a brown crayon, and "takes exception" to the contention that she tried to deceive people. Asked by Matt Lauer if she is an "an African-American woman," Dolezal said: "I identify as black." Anthony Quintano AP
In this image released by NBC News, former NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal appears on the “Today’’ show during an interview with co-host Matt Lauer, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in New York. Dolezal, who resigned as head of a NAACP chapter after her parents said she is white, said Tuesday that she started identifying as black around age 5, when she drew self-portraits with a brown crayon, and "takes exception" to the contention that she tried to deceive people. Asked by Matt Lauer if she is an "an African-American woman," Dolezal said: "I identify as black." Anthony Quintano AP

The Dolezal drama hints at how identity has become fluid

June 22, 2015 09:10 AM

UPDATED June 22, 2015 03:27 PM

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About Ana Veciana-Suarez

Ana Veciana Suarez

@AnaVeciana

Ana Veciana-Suarez writes a column about family, women's and social issues. She is the author of Flight to Freedom and The Chin Kiss King.