Most of your calcium intake should come from food, not dietary supplements, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins. Calcium from food, no matter how high the intake, was not associated with increased risk of calcium plaque buildup, which can lead to heart disease. In fact, food is protective.
Most of your calcium intake should come from food, not dietary supplements, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins. Calcium from food, no matter how high the intake, was not associated with increased risk of calcium plaque buildup, which can lead to heart disease. In fact, food is protective.
Most of your calcium intake should come from food, not dietary supplements, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins. Calcium from food, no matter how high the intake, was not associated with increased risk of calcium plaque buildup, which can lead to heart disease. In fact, food is protective.

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Most of your calcium intake should not come from supplements

October 17, 2016 8:28 PM

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About Sheah Rarback

Sheah Rarback

@SheahRarback

Sheah Rarback, a registered dietitian, is on the faculty of the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. She answers your questions about nutrition.