Geri Taylor visits the Riverwalk in Jupiter in 2015. After being diagnosed with the early symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, she and her husband decided to plunge ahead with their lives.
Geri Taylor visits the Riverwalk in Jupiter in 2015. After being diagnosed with the early symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, she and her husband decided to plunge ahead with their lives. MICHAEL KIRBY SMITH The New York Times
Geri Taylor visits the Riverwalk in Jupiter in 2015. After being diagnosed with the early symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, she and her husband decided to plunge ahead with their lives. MICHAEL KIRBY SMITH The New York Times

They invited a witness for Alzheimer’s journey. And here is what he saw.

May 10, 2016 10:09 AM

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