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  • What's up with HIV laws in America?

    Well-intentioned laws meant to prevent the spread of HIV have instead helped contribute to the stigma around the disease. By basing the laws on outdated science, studies have shown that the laws actually hurt the public health effort to reduce the spread of the disease.

Well-intentioned laws meant to prevent the spread of HIV have instead helped contribute to the stigma around the disease. By basing the laws on outdated science, studies have shown that the laws actually hurt the public health effort to reduce the spread of the disease. Daniel Desrochers and Natalie Fertig / McClatchy
Well-intentioned laws meant to prevent the spread of HIV have instead helped contribute to the stigma around the disease. By basing the laws on outdated science, studies have shown that the laws actually hurt the public health effort to reduce the spread of the disease. Daniel Desrochers and Natalie Fertig / McClatchy

Keeping Kids Fit: What to do when your teen is diagnosed with HIV

April 04, 2016 05:46 PM

UPDATED April 05, 2016 12:38 PM

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  • It's only temporary - smartphone blindness

    Smartphone habits may force doctors to ask patients a few more questions when diagnosing vision or neurological problems. “I think if a person experiences a temporary loss of vision in one eye, that’s potentially a very important problem for which they should seek medical attention,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. Dean Wingerchuk. “But, it doesn’t always mean there’s an abnormality.”