UHealth surgeon Dr. Matthias Loebe, left, breaks into laughter after Erika Carter-Rolle gives him instructions on the prior use of the device's batteries. An assistant principal at M.A. Milam K-8 Center, Carter-Rolle is recovering from a life-saving heart transplant after eight years of "buying time" through the full spectrum of comprehensive care before getting a transplant. Her doctors and husband joined her during a press conference on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015.
UHealth surgeon Dr. Matthias Loebe, left, breaks into laughter after Erika Carter-Rolle gives him instructions on the prior use of the device's batteries. An assistant principal at M.A. Milam K-8 Center, Carter-Rolle is recovering from a life-saving heart transplant after eight years of "buying time" through the full spectrum of comprehensive care before getting a transplant. Her doctors and husband joined her during a press conference on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com
UHealth surgeon Dr. Matthias Loebe, left, breaks into laughter after Erika Carter-Rolle gives him instructions on the prior use of the device's batteries. An assistant principal at M.A. Milam K-8 Center, Carter-Rolle is recovering from a life-saving heart transplant after eight years of "buying time" through the full spectrum of comprehensive care before getting a transplant. Her doctors and husband joined her during a press conference on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com

Heart transplant gives assistant principal a second chance at life

November 23, 2015 06:11 PM

UPDATED November 24, 2015 12:52 AM

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