At just 12 hours old, Joshua Simons father started calling his first child PJ “ for Pride and Joy. PJ was born two months premature, weighing just 3 pounds, 5 ounces. He soon had a “pediatric stroke†and developed hydrocephalus "water on the brain." The neurologist at Miami Children’s Hospital told PJ’s parents that their son would never walk, talk or know them – and that they should consider putting PJ in an institution. That was 1984. On Nov. 17, 2014, PJ (seen here tidying up the gym) celebrated his 30th birthday – at work – as a gym attendant at Key Biscayne Community Center.
At just 12 hours old, Joshua Simons father started calling his first child PJ “ for Pride and Joy. PJ was born two months premature, weighing just 3 pounds, 5 ounces. He soon had a “pediatric stroke†and developed hydrocephalus "water on the brain." The neurologist at Miami Children’s Hospital told PJ’s parents that their son would never walk, talk or know them – and that they should consider putting PJ in an institution. That was 1984. On Nov. 17, 2014, PJ (seen here tidying up the gym) celebrated his 30th birthday – at work – as a gym attendant at Key Biscayne Community Center. PATRICK FARRELL MIAMI HERALD STAFF
At just 12 hours old, Joshua Simons father started calling his first child PJ “ for Pride and Joy. PJ was born two months premature, weighing just 3 pounds, 5 ounces. He soon had a “pediatric stroke†and developed hydrocephalus "water on the brain." The neurologist at Miami Children’s Hospital told PJ’s parents that their son would never walk, talk or know them – and that they should consider putting PJ in an institution. That was 1984. On Nov. 17, 2014, PJ (seen here tidying up the gym) celebrated his 30th birthday – at work – as a gym attendant at Key Biscayne Community Center. PATRICK FARRELL MIAMI HERALD STAFF

From premature infant to marathon man

December 08, 2014 03:11 PM

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