Though she had no family history of breast cancer, Sari Sosa decided to have a double mastectomy when she was diagnosed. She didn't want to face another cancer scare years later. She says she has no regrets.
Though she had no family history of breast cancer, Sari Sosa decided to have a double mastectomy when she was diagnosed. She didn't want to face another cancer scare years later. She says she has no regrets. C.W. Griffin Miami Herald Staff
Though she had no family history of breast cancer, Sari Sosa decided to have a double mastectomy when she was diagnosed. She didn't want to face another cancer scare years later. She says she has no regrets. C.W. Griffin Miami Herald Staff

Study: Bilateral mastectomies don’t improve breast cancer patients’ odds

October 17, 2014 08:00 AM

UPDATED October 13, 2015 11:32 AM

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