TESTING PRECIOUS HEARING:  Dr. Annie Rodriguez conducts a hearing examination on Henry Figueroa, 3, as his mother, Jylinette Fontani, holds him in one of the pediatric audio booths at UM’s med school recently.
TESTING PRECIOUS HEARING: Dr. Annie Rodriguez conducts a hearing examination on Henry Figueroa, 3, as his mother, Jylinette Fontani, holds him in one of the pediatric audio booths at UM’s med school recently. PETER ANDREW BOSCH MIAMI HERALD STAFF
TESTING PRECIOUS HEARING: Dr. Annie Rodriguez conducts a hearing examination on Henry Figueroa, 3, as his mother, Jylinette Fontani, holds him in one of the pediatric audio booths at UM’s med school recently. PETER ANDREW BOSCH MIAMI HERALD STAFF

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