Ongoing battle: As a brain cancer patient, Victor Ramirez, 20, of Kendall had to relearn how to walk and went through speech therapy classes as his voice changed after surgery. Ramirez still lives with the side effects of his treatment.
Ongoing battle: As a brain cancer patient, Victor Ramirez, 20, of Kendall had to relearn how to walk and went through speech therapy classes as his voice changed after surgery. Ramirez still lives with the side effects of his treatment. DANIEL BOCK FOR THE MIAMI HERALD
Ongoing battle: As a brain cancer patient, Victor Ramirez, 20, of Kendall had to relearn how to walk and went through speech therapy classes as his voice changed after surgery. Ramirez still lives with the side effects of his treatment. DANIEL BOCK FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

Childhood cancer effects can be felt much later

May 22, 2015 08:13 AM

UPDATED May 23, 2015 05:09 PM

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