Dr. Ricardo Estape, meets with his patient, Mrs. Nilda Acosta, at South Miami Hospital on Monday, May 11, 2015, to discuss her treatment for ovarian cancer. He has used a type of chemo that had been used for appendix, but now is also being used for ovarian cancer.
Dr. Ricardo Estape, meets with his patient, Mrs. Nilda Acosta, at South Miami Hospital on Monday, May 11, 2015, to discuss her treatment for ovarian cancer. He has used a type of chemo that had been used for appendix, but now is also being used for ovarian cancer. PATRICK FARRELL MIAMI HERALD STAFF
Dr. Ricardo Estape, meets with his patient, Mrs. Nilda Acosta, at South Miami Hospital on Monday, May 11, 2015, to discuss her treatment for ovarian cancer. He has used a type of chemo that had been used for appendix, but now is also being used for ovarian cancer. PATRICK FARRELL MIAMI HERALD STAFF

New drugs improving the outcomes in some ovarian cancer cases

May 22, 2015 08:04 AM

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