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  • Air Force special-ops trainee Paul Casas, on being diagnosed with Moyamoya disease, a rare brain disease.

    Paul Casas, a 28-year-old Special Ops Air Force trainee, first became aware of his symptoms when his left arm would go numb and his memory began to slip. He was diagnosed wtih Moyamoya disease, a rare condition that causes blood flow to the brain to be restricted. A University of Miami neurosurgeon, Jacques Morcos, M.D., operated on him on May 24 at Jackson Memorial, performing a double-barrel bypass that would essentially give him a new artery to supply blood flow to the right side of his brain. Four days after the operation, Casas was discharged from the hospital, cured. His symptoms immediately disappeared, with his memory immediately coming back. Casas shared his experience at a new conference on Tuesday, June 6, 2017.

Air Force special-ops trainee Paul Casas, on being diagnosed with Moyamoya disease, a rare brain disease.

Paul Casas, a 28-year-old Special Ops Air Force trainee, first became aware of his symptoms when his left arm would go numb and his memory began to slip. He was diagnosed wtih Moyamoya disease, a rare condition that causes blood flow to the brain to be restricted. A University of Miami neurosurgeon, Jacques Morcos, M.D., operated on him on May 24 at Jackson Memorial, performing a double-barrel bypass that would essentially give him a new artery to supply blood flow to the right side of his brain. Four days after the operation, Casas was discharged from the hospital, cured. His symptoms immediately disappeared, with his memory immediately coming back. Casas shared his experience at a new conference on Tuesday, June 6, 2017.
Carl Juste The Miami Herald