Adele Elchert preps dinner and puts away her lunch box in her apartment kitchen in Gainesville, Fla. Elchert said she loves living in an apartment, and the independence that it gives her. She is being treated at the Arc of Alachua, a nonprofit organization that treats patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a genetic disorder in which people never feel full and have a voracious hunger.
Adele Elchert preps dinner and puts away her lunch box in her apartment kitchen in Gainesville, Fla. Elchert said she loves living in an apartment, and the independence that it gives her. She is being treated at the Arc of Alachua, a nonprofit organization that treats patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a genetic disorder in which people never feel full and have a voracious hunger. Shannon Kaestle Special to the Miami Herald
Adele Elchert preps dinner and puts away her lunch box in her apartment kitchen in Gainesville, Fla. Elchert said she loves living in an apartment, and the independence that it gives her. She is being treated at the Arc of Alachua, a nonprofit organization that treats patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a genetic disorder in which people never feel full and have a voracious hunger. Shannon Kaestle Special to the Miami Herald

A Gainesville program is helping people with an insatiable hunger

March 16, 2015 09:51 PM

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