Neil Vogel rides his bike near his home in Parkland. Vogel, who works in corporate financing, lost 185 pounds in two years after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. His diabetes is doing much better.
Neil Vogel rides his bike near his home in Parkland. Vogel, who works in corporate financing, lost 185 pounds in two years after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. His diabetes is doing much better. MATIAS J. OCNER For the Miami Herald
Neil Vogel rides his bike near his home in Parkland. Vogel, who works in corporate financing, lost 185 pounds in two years after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. His diabetes is doing much better. MATIAS J. OCNER For the Miami Herald

He lost 185 pounds, and gained his health

November 22, 2016 09:58 PM

UPDATED November 22, 2016 09:58 PM

More Videos

  • It's only temporary - smartphone blindness

    Smartphone habits may force doctors to ask patients a few more questions when diagnosing vision or neurological problems. “I think if a person experiences a temporary loss of vision in one eye, that’s potentially a very important problem for which they should seek medical attention,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Dr. Dean Wingerchuk. “But, it doesn’t always mean there’s an abnormality.”