Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as she answers a question during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. A new report by the American Psychological Association poll found that more than half of U.S. adults, regardless of party, felt very or somewhat stressed by the election.
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as she answers a question during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. A new report by the American Psychological Association poll found that more than half of U.S. adults, regardless of party, felt very or somewhat stressed by the election. Julio Cortez AP
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks at Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as she answers a question during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016. A new report by the American Psychological Association poll found that more than half of U.S. adults, regardless of party, felt very or somewhat stressed by the election. Julio Cortez AP

This election is stressing us out, psychologists say. Here’s how to cope.

October 20, 2016 10:00 AM

UPDATED October 21, 2016 03:05 PM

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