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  • Video: Water managers begin draining water into Everglades National Park for the first time in decades

    Jesse Kennon, owner of Coopertown Airboats Tours, speaks about increased water levels south of Tamiami Trail in the Everglades. Record rain this winter has pushed South Florida into emergency mode: with Lake Okeechobee nearly full, water managers have begun dumping water into rivers to the east and west. To ease pressure on a massive 1,000-acre water conservation area to the south that usually holds water but is full from local run-off, managers have begun sending water into the L-29 along the Tamiami Trail and out the Shark River Slough.

Video: Water managers begin draining water into Everglades National Park for the first time in decades

Jesse Kennon, owner of Coopertown Airboats Tours, speaks about increased water levels south of Tamiami Trail in the Everglades. Record rain this winter has pushed South Florida into emergency mode: with Lake Okeechobee nearly full, water managers have begun dumping water into rivers to the east and west. To ease pressure on a massive 1,000-acre water conservation area to the south that usually holds water but is full from local run-off, managers have begun sending water into the L-29 along the Tamiami Trail and out the Shark River Slough.
Walter Michot wmichot@miamiherald.com