Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson, center, walks toward a meeting with Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and other officials on April 16 at Philadelphia City Hall. On April 12, a Starbucks in Philadelphia refused to allow two black men to use the bathroom while they waited for a colleague, calling police to have them arrested. Johnson took immediate action, flying to the location, speaking with national media and community groups, apologizing, and announcing the closing of over 8,000 company-owned U.S. stores on May 29 for an afternoon to provide racial-bias education for U.S. Starbucks employees. Following this response, the store — which had been closed temporarily because of demonstrations — reopened and returned to business as usual, according to news reports.
Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson, center, walks toward a meeting with Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and other officials on April 16 at Philadelphia City Hall. On April 12, a Starbucks in Philadelphia refused to allow two black men to use the bathroom while they waited for a colleague, calling police to have them arrested. Johnson took immediate action, flying to the location, speaking with national media and community groups, apologizing, and announcing the closing of over 8,000 company-owned U.S. stores on May 29 for an afternoon to provide racial-bias education for U.S. Starbucks employees. Following this response, the store — which had been closed temporarily because of demonstrations — reopened and returned to business as usual, according to news reports. Jacqueline Larma AP
Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson, center, walks toward a meeting with Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and other officials on April 16 at Philadelphia City Hall. On April 12, a Starbucks in Philadelphia refused to allow two black men to use the bathroom while they waited for a colleague, calling police to have them arrested. Johnson took immediate action, flying to the location, speaking with national media and community groups, apologizing, and announcing the closing of over 8,000 company-owned U.S. stores on May 29 for an afternoon to provide racial-bias education for U.S. Starbucks employees. Following this response, the store — which had been closed temporarily because of demonstrations — reopened and returned to business as usual, according to news reports. Jacqueline Larma AP

In today’s uncertain times, planning for the unexpected is critical

April 22, 2018 07:00 AM