Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art + Design Presents the inaugural Exhibition at the new Cultural Legacy Gallery, Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres MOAD - Cuban Diaspora Celia L Credit: Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in collaboration with Tico Torres Miami, July 28, 2014 - The Museum of Art + Design (MOAD) at Miami Dade College (MDC) presents Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres. The inaugural exhibition will open to the public at 6 p.m. Friday, September 19, at the new Cultural Legacy Gallery, a permanent space dedicated to the impact of Cuban culture on South Florida and throughout the world, housed at the National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College in Downtown Miami. Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in collaboration with Tico Torres features what have become iconic photographs of Cuban figures living outside the island, among them performers, composers, designers, writers and artists. The Cuba Out of Cuba series was shot over the last twenty years in Miami, New York, London, Paris, Florence, Venice and Los Angeles. The exhibition will take a unique and historical approach in surveying the legacies of individuals such as Celia Cruz, Bebo Valdez, Gloria Estefan, Cristina Saralegui, Andy Garcia, Cundo Bermudez, Nilo Cruz, and Paquito d’Rivera, among other Cubans who have influenced the greater culture of their time. Alexis Rodríguez-Duarte was born in Havana, Cuba. In 1968 he and his parents were among Cuban exiles who left the Island aboard the humanitarian air lifts called the Freedom Flights. Once arriving to Miami, his family and many thousands of other Cuban exiles came through the doors of the Freedom Tower that served as a processing and assistance center for the exile community. For many, the tower provided nothing less than their freedom from Castro and the hardships Cuba had come to give them, rightly earning its name of the Freedom Tower. Rodriguez–Duarte’s family settled in Miami’s Little Havana community. At the age of 10, he was given his first camera by his grandfather, which led to his love affair with photography. Today, he is a New York and Miami-based internationally renowned photographer whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Town & Country, and Harper’s Bazaar, among other major publications, and has exhibited his work at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., Museum of the City of New York, The Victoria and Albert Museum in London and The Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach among others. Rodriguez-Duarte and his husband of 31 years, Tico Torres, have been documenting the Cuban diaspora since 1993. Torres, a photo stylist who is a master of the mise-en-scene, helped create with Rodriguez-Duarte the joyous image of Celia Cruz standing amid the towering palms of Fairchild Tropical Garden in a traditional ruffled Cuban gown. He was also there to set the mood in the London flat of Guillermo Cabrera Infante, one of Cuba’s most famous authors. Torres and his family were also among Cuban exiles who settled in Miami’s Hialeah community. Rodriguez-Duarte and Torres are thrilled to be returning together, full circle to the historic Freedom Tower for this inaugural exhibit, after separately setting foot there as immigrant children so many years before. The inaugural exhibition kicks off the Museum’s fall season scheduled for Friday, September 19, 2014 from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. in conjunction with SIDE BY SIDE: MDCULTURE STANDS AS ONE, a one night event held at the College’s historic Freedom Tower, featuring performances, exhibitions, film screenings, the public unveiling of 2014 Book Fair Poster, and the long awaited Cuban Exile Experience at the Freedom Tower. Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres will remain on display at the museum through August 30, 2015. All exhibitions are free and open to the public. MDC’s Freedom Tower was operated by the U.S. Government as a reception center for Cuban refugees from 1962 to 1974. “The building is significant because it represents the important story of the Cuban exodus to America and resettlement during the Cold War,” reports the U.S. Department of the Interior, which has also called the Freedom Tower the “Ellis Island of the South.” Though it operated in that capacity for only 12 years, the building has become an icon representing the faith that democracy brought to troubled lives, the generosity of the American people and a hopeful beginning that assured thousands a new life in a new land. WHAT: Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres WHEN: Friday, September 19 –Opening Reception from 6 – 9 p.m. September 19, 2014 – August 30, 2015 Museum Hours: Wednesday – Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. WHERE: MDC Museum of Art + Design Cultural Legacy Gallery The Freedom Tower at MDC, First Floor 600 Biscayne Blvd. About MDC Museum of Art + Design MDC Museum of Art + Design (MOAD) is Miami Dade College’s flagship institution dedicated to the presentation and exhibition of visual art and design, housed at the National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College in Downtown Miami. The mission of the Museum is to promote the appreciation and understanding of art and its role in society through direct engagement with original works of art from within the College’s extensive permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. Furthermore, the Museum presents year-round lectures, symposiums and art related events to expose, educate and engage the greater public through related creative processes. The MDC Museum of Art + Design provides its patrons and visitors access to unique cultural, historical and educational exhibitions that enrich the greater community while building and preserving an expansive permanent art collection. Miami Dade College has been collecting art since the 1960s. Over the years, the collection has grown contain more than 1,600 works in all mediums and genres, specifically within the movements of minimalism, pop art of the ’60s and ’70s, conceptual art and contemporary Latin American art. The College and Museum actively acquire works by emerging and under-recognized artists, as well as major figures in modern, post-modern and contemporary art. About The Cuban Exile Experience & Cultural Legacy Gallery The Cuban Exile Experience & Cultural Legacy Gallery is a historical division of the MDC Museum of Art + Design. In addition to visual arts, the Museum supports exhibitions and programs that collect, preserve, research and interpret stories and artifacts that help build a better community understanding and appreciation of the Freedom Tower’s history. For more information about the exhibition, events or VIP Opening Reception at MDC Museum of Art + Design, please contact the Museum at 305-237-7722 or museum@mdc.edu. Event contacts: Juan Mendieta, 305-237-7611, jmendiet@mdc.edu, MDC communications director Tere Estorino Florin, 305-237-3949, testorin@mdc.edu, MDC media relations director Roxana Romero, 305-237-3366, rromero3@mdc.edu, media specialist Sue Arrowsmith, 305-237-3710, sue.arrowsmith@mdc.edu, media specialist Alejandro Rios, 305-237-7482, arios1@mdc.edu

Jesus S Castano

6 people loved this story

Jesus S's Story

Hi, everybody..... it is exciting to find this great website and interactive database of all the Pedro Pan kids... this is a massive effort of the Miami Herald and I sure hope that by these means, we can re-connect with old friends from the different camps....

I was at Kendall and later on Opa-Locka. My mom arrived from Cuba on a Red Cross ship two years later and I left the camp to live with her.... my older brother and his wife were already living in Pittsburgh by this time. I never left Florida to live with any foster family, or in a hostile environment... my memories of Kendall and the Hermanos Maristas have always been refreshing and pleasant. I thank my family for sending me out of a living hell, a beautiful island in the Caribbean which has been under oppresion for 50+ years already. I consider myself exceedingly blessed by God for giving me freedom, my family which was reunited and lots of friends around the world. I've been outside Florida for 31 years, living and working hard in the field of Education in Washington, DC. I love this city and what I do for a living. My folks are in Miami Beach, and a few remain on the island.... I've visited them 3 times in the last 20 years and feel very sorry for them and other Cubans my age who grew up tormented and in misery, wishing each and every day of their lives that they, too, could have lived in the U.S.A. with their civil rights to worship, read/write and vote for whomever they want. PEDRO PANS are the lucky ones.... we are survivors. All of us, let's celebrate every day of our lives!

Jay

Jesus S's News Feed

Leave a public message for Jesus S.

Page 1 2 3 Next >>

Jesus S has uploaded new photos.

Status update | Jan 20th 2014

Hello Jesus este es Manzanita mi nombre es ALberto Mi email is cubanpolo@aol.com

Message by Angel A Caraballo de la Portilla | Feb 19th 2013

Jesus S has uploaded new photos.

Status update | Feb 6th 2013

Jesus S has uploaded new photos.

Status update | Sep 7th 2012

Jesus S says: Hello, Pedro Pan brothers and sisters.IN MEMORIAM for Elly Chovel..."Five years ago she entered heaven and is in the company of Msgr. Walsh." 9-09

Status update | Sep 6th 2012

Jesus S has uploaded new photos.

Status update | Jul 8th 2012

Jesus S has uploaded new photos.

Status update | Jun 24th 2012

Jay darling, Albertina's photo is in my profile page. There is really no "story," but everytime Msgr. Walsh wrote about our heroes in Cuba he mentioned her. She wrote a book about her very interesting life and the University of Miami Cuban Heritage Collection interviewed her a few years ago as part of their Living History Project. You can see that on their website. I may interview her also soon.

Message by Eloísa Echazábal | Sep 22nd 2011

Hi Jay! There are two persons I know who may know of your Angel Ms. Esnard de Pina. One is Sister Leonor Esnard. She is a Pedro Pan who used to teach at Barry University and at some point was also a board member of OPPG. I promise I'll call her soon and will ask her. The other one is Albertina O'Farrill. She is another one of the courageous ladies who obtained and distributed visa waivers to the children in Cuba. I'll go visit her soon and will ask her. Cariños, Eloísa

Message by Eloísa Echazábal | Sep 21st 2011

Jesus S has updated their profile.

Status update | Sep 20th 2011

Page 1 2 3 Next >>

Leave a message for Jesus S

 
Your message
Your name
Your e-mail