Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art + Design Presents the inaugural Exhibition at the new Cultural Legacy Gallery, Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres MOAD - Cuban Diaspora Celia L Credit: Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in collaboration with Tico Torres Miami, July 28, 2014 - The Museum of Art + Design (MOAD) at Miami Dade College (MDC) presents Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres. The inaugural exhibition will open to the public at 6 p.m. Friday, September 19, at the new Cultural Legacy Gallery, a permanent space dedicated to the impact of Cuban culture on South Florida and throughout the world, housed at the National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College in Downtown Miami. Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in collaboration with Tico Torres features what have become iconic photographs of Cuban figures living outside the island, among them performers, composers, designers, writers and artists. The Cuba Out of Cuba series was shot over the last twenty years in Miami, New York, London, Paris, Florence, Venice and Los Angeles. The exhibition will take a unique and historical approach in surveying the legacies of individuals such as Celia Cruz, Bebo Valdez, Gloria Estefan, Cristina Saralegui, Andy Garcia, Cundo Bermudez, Nilo Cruz, and Paquito d’Rivera, among other Cubans who have influenced the greater culture of their time. Alexis Rodríguez-Duarte was born in Havana, Cuba. In 1968 he and his parents were among Cuban exiles who left the Island aboard the humanitarian air lifts called the Freedom Flights. Once arriving to Miami, his family and many thousands of other Cuban exiles came through the doors of the Freedom Tower that served as a processing and assistance center for the exile community. For many, the tower provided nothing less than their freedom from Castro and the hardships Cuba had come to give them, rightly earning its name of the Freedom Tower. Rodriguez–Duarte’s family settled in Miami’s Little Havana community. At the age of 10, he was given his first camera by his grandfather, which led to his love affair with photography. Today, he is a New York and Miami-based internationally renowned photographer whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Town & Country, and Harper’s Bazaar, among other major publications, and has exhibited his work at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., Museum of the City of New York, The Victoria and Albert Museum in London and The Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach among others. Rodriguez-Duarte and his husband of 31 years, Tico Torres, have been documenting the Cuban diaspora since 1993. Torres, a photo stylist who is a master of the mise-en-scene, helped create with Rodriguez-Duarte the joyous image of Celia Cruz standing amid the towering palms of Fairchild Tropical Garden in a traditional ruffled Cuban gown. He was also there to set the mood in the London flat of Guillermo Cabrera Infante, one of Cuba’s most famous authors. Torres and his family were also among Cuban exiles who settled in Miami’s Hialeah community. Rodriguez-Duarte and Torres are thrilled to be returning together, full circle to the historic Freedom Tower for this inaugural exhibit, after separately setting foot there as immigrant children so many years before. The inaugural exhibition kicks off the Museum’s fall season scheduled for Friday, September 19, 2014 from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. in conjunction with SIDE BY SIDE: MDCULTURE STANDS AS ONE, a one night event held at the College’s historic Freedom Tower, featuring performances, exhibitions, film screenings, the public unveiling of 2014 Book Fair Poster, and the long awaited Cuban Exile Experience at the Freedom Tower. Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres will remain on display at the museum through August 30, 2015. All exhibitions are free and open to the public. MDC’s Freedom Tower was operated by the U.S. Government as a reception center for Cuban refugees from 1962 to 1974. “The building is significant because it represents the important story of the Cuban exodus to America and resettlement during the Cold War,” reports the U.S. Department of the Interior, which has also called the Freedom Tower the “Ellis Island of the South.” Though it operated in that capacity for only 12 years, the building has become an icon representing the faith that democracy brought to troubled lives, the generosity of the American people and a hopeful beginning that assured thousands a new life in a new land. WHAT: Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres WHEN: Friday, September 19 –Opening Reception from 6 – 9 p.m. September 19, 2014 – August 30, 2015 Museum Hours: Wednesday – Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. WHERE: MDC Museum of Art + Design Cultural Legacy Gallery The Freedom Tower at MDC, First Floor 600 Biscayne Blvd. About MDC Museum of Art + Design MDC Museum of Art + Design (MOAD) is Miami Dade College’s flagship institution dedicated to the presentation and exhibition of visual art and design, housed at the National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College in Downtown Miami. The mission of the Museum is to promote the appreciation and understanding of art and its role in society through direct engagement with original works of art from within the College’s extensive permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. Furthermore, the Museum presents year-round lectures, symposiums and art related events to expose, educate and engage the greater public through related creative processes. The MDC Museum of Art + Design provides its patrons and visitors access to unique cultural, historical and educational exhibitions that enrich the greater community while building and preserving an expansive permanent art collection. Miami Dade College has been collecting art since the 1960s. Over the years, the collection has grown contain more than 1,600 works in all mediums and genres, specifically within the movements of minimalism, pop art of the ’60s and ’70s, conceptual art and contemporary Latin American art. The College and Museum actively acquire works by emerging and under-recognized artists, as well as major figures in modern, post-modern and contemporary art. About The Cuban Exile Experience & Cultural Legacy Gallery The Cuban Exile Experience & Cultural Legacy Gallery is a historical division of the MDC Museum of Art + Design. In addition to visual arts, the Museum supports exhibitions and programs that collect, preserve, research and interpret stories and artifacts that help build a better community understanding and appreciation of the Freedom Tower’s history. For more information about the exhibition, events or VIP Opening Reception at MDC Museum of Art + Design, please contact the Museum at 305-237-7722 or museum@mdc.edu. Event contacts: Juan Mendieta, 305-237-7611, jmendiet@mdc.edu, MDC communications director Tere Estorino Florin, 305-237-3949, testorin@mdc.edu, MDC media relations director Roxana Romero, 305-237-3366, rromero3@mdc.edu, media specialist Sue Arrowsmith, 305-237-3710, sue.arrowsmith@mdc.edu, media specialist Alejandro Rios, 305-237-7482, arios1@mdc.edu

Susana (Susy) Garrandés Gonzalez

General Information
Current Name
Susy Rodriguez
Current Location
United States of America
Name on Arrival
Susana (Susy) Garrandés Gonzalez
Age on Arrival
10
Date of Arrival
Friday, March 23, 1962
Relocated To
St. Vincent's Orphanage, Vincennes, Indiana
Stayed With
Velasco family-Florida City
Groups
Haiti Pedro Pan
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Susana, please, accept my sincerest apologies. In light of the tragic events you're going through at the moment, my inquiry is without a doubt foolish, if not outright insensitive. My heartfelt condolescences go out to you and your loved ones on your brother's passing and on the passing of friends you hold close to your heart. Fondly and with my deepest sympathies, José Antonio Amaro Reyes.

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Aug 16th 2009

Susana, you were saying... I'm referring to your message to me of Thursday 08/13/09 @ 8:00 a.m. I feel as though you were about to say something when you were interrupted by your duties. Ever since then I've been waiting for you to finish conveying your thought. I'm looking forward to it. Affectionately, José Antonio Amaro Reyes.

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Aug 15th 2009

PS, I meant should, not shuld. It is so hard to proof read in that little square.

Message by Carmen Valdivia | Aug 13th 2009

Susy, your idea of contacting the Pedro Pan Network Administrator asking if they would be willing to post the idea of a proposal for the Florida City Camp commemorative plaque is very good. Should they reply in the affirmative, I think that our Jose Antonio, with his instruction manual, has proven to be the master articulator and could draft an outstanding proposal. In the mean time I am trying to contact some PP that might have some idea of the feasability of the project. I am doing so by other means as to not put them on the spot shuld they decide that they don't want to get involved. I will keep you guys posted as to my findings. Love, Carmen

Message by Carmen Valdivia | Aug 13th 2009

Susana, your idea of requesting the Pedro Pan Network Administrator to ask for feedback on the Florida City Camp commemorative plaque idea/proposal from other registered Pedro Pans is a good one. Perhaps we first should ask him/her whether he/she would be willing to post it. Assuming his/her response is affirmative, we should then figure out the best way to frame the question. Sometimes the way a response is ellicited is almost as important as what is being ellicited. So why don't we just ask the administrator first and proceed accordingly depending on his/her response. Of course, you should you feel free to do it in whatever way you feel would be most fruitful. Rest assured that you can count on my full support regardless. Lastly, may I suggest we consult Carmen too? She may have some ideas of her own that she would like to share with us. Thank you for taking the time to give this matter your full consideration. Warm regards, José Antonio Amaro Reyes.

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Aug 12th 2009

Susana, thank you for your generous comments on getting things rolling on a commemorative plaque for the Florida City Camp. Bear in mind, however, that for it to become a reality we must all express an interest. As you know, no movement ever reaches critical mass without a large number of people getting behind it. Hopefully, the remainder of our Pedro Pan brothers and sisters will join us in expressing such an interest. Needless to say, it gratifies my heart immensily to know that you support it. Now we need to reach out to others for their support as well. As Carmen so wisely noted: "no hay peor gestión que la que no se hace." I'm very sorry you weren't able to see the current condition of what used to be the Florida City Camp using Google. Perhaps your memories of the camp are a bit too fuzzy at the moment. I would suggest you visit the Miami Herald's Pedro Pan website, where several pictures of the camp are on display. Better yet, you might want to paste the link included below to your browser and go directly to it. Image # 1 provides a panoramic view of the camp. The picture was taken from the second floor of the building where many of the girls'homes were located; that is, from a south to north direction. Looking westward, you'll see many of the individual houses where the boys lived while looking eastward you'll see the cafeteria (comedor)buiding as well as other buildings, which housed mostly boys also. Once you have refreshed your memory, you might want to go back to the Google instructions I provided. The address I chose will place you half-way the street that cuts across the camp from north to south. If you followed the directions correctly, you probably saw the front of the house that corresponds to the aforementioned address(one of the boys'houses). Next, look up at the Google navigating tool on the upper left corner; it looks like a car's steering wheel with 4 arrow heads. Click on the arrow head pointing left until you see s full view of the street appear on the screen. By the way, at the end of the street, in the far distance, you will see the girls' building. To travel up and down the street with the navigator, place the cursor or mouse pointer on the street and a line with arrow heads pointing in opposite directions will automatically appear. Assuming that you might want to travel towards the girls' building, you would have to click on the arrow head pointing in that direction. As you will notice every single time you click on it, you'll be moving closer toward the building. In other words, you'll be navigating. If along the way you feel like looking at the front of a house, go back to the navigation control on the upper left corner and click on the appropriate arrow head. By the way, whenever you move the cursor away from the street, the navigation line will disappear. Here's the http address to the Miami Herald's Florida City pictures I mentioned earlier: http://www.miamiherald.com/1491/gallery/1047247.html If, by any chance, you deem it necessary to ask for further assistance, please, do not hesitate to ask. Estoy a tu disposición. Thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts. Warm regards, José Antonio Amaro Reyes

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Aug 12th 2009

Susana, by the way, you do not need to have Google Earth installed to access the street view of Florida City. This is all you need to do: 1. Access Google with your regular browser: http://www.Google.com 2. Choose maps in the Google web page (top left corner) 3. In the Google Maps page, type in the following address: 1440 NW 2nd Ave Florida City Florida and click on "Search Maps" 4. Inside the map, you will see a small window with the address you asked for. Next click on "Street View" in the small window. 5. You'll see the house which corresponds to the address. Next, use the Google Navigator Control(Top left corner)to get a full view of the street and be able to navigate up and down as well as sideways. You'll get the hang of it after you mess around with it for a little while. 6. Happy traveling down memory lane, Susy!

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Aug 11th 2009

Estimada Susana, escribe la siguiente dirección en Google Earth: 1440 NW 2nd Avenue Florida City Florida. Dicha dirección te ubicará en el mismo corazón del campamento (La 2da avenida NW es la calle que atravesaba el campamento desde las oficinas hasta el edificio donde se alojaban las niñas). Una vez que Google Earth te ubique en dicha dirección, selecciona "Street View", lo cual te permitirá navegar por dentro del campamento.

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Aug 11th 2009

Hi Susy, donde estoy ahora no tengo el Google Earth, pero si buscas en Florida City entre la 8 y la 14 calle de norte a sur, y entre la 1 Avenida del N.W. y el antes mencionado rock quarry, encuentras el campamento que esta igualito. Espero lo encuentres, sino cuando llegue a la casa te mando mas especificas instrucciones, o un link. Muchos cariños, Carmen

Message by Carmen Valdivia | Aug 11th 2009

Susy, I loved your story, it is so vivid and real you can actually feel you are there. Thanks for sharing it with us, I know how hard it is, especially at this time for you to do this. I send you all my love....

Message by Carmencita Romanach | Aug 10th 2009

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