Miami Dade College’s Museum of Art + Design Presents the inaugural Exhibition at the new Cultural Legacy Gallery, Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres MOAD - Cuban Diaspora Celia L Credit: Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in collaboration with Tico Torres Miami, July 28, 2014 - The Museum of Art + Design (MOAD) at Miami Dade College (MDC) presents Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres. The inaugural exhibition will open to the public at 6 p.m. Friday, September 19, at the new Cultural Legacy Gallery, a permanent space dedicated to the impact of Cuban culture on South Florida and throughout the world, housed at the National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College in Downtown Miami. Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in collaboration with Tico Torres features what have become iconic photographs of Cuban figures living outside the island, among them performers, composers, designers, writers and artists. The Cuba Out of Cuba series was shot over the last twenty years in Miami, New York, London, Paris, Florence, Venice and Los Angeles. The exhibition will take a unique and historical approach in surveying the legacies of individuals such as Celia Cruz, Bebo Valdez, Gloria Estefan, Cristina Saralegui, Andy Garcia, Cundo Bermudez, Nilo Cruz, and Paquito d’Rivera, among other Cubans who have influenced the greater culture of their time. Alexis Rodríguez-Duarte was born in Havana, Cuba. In 1968 he and his parents were among Cuban exiles who left the Island aboard the humanitarian air lifts called the Freedom Flights. Once arriving to Miami, his family and many thousands of other Cuban exiles came through the doors of the Freedom Tower that served as a processing and assistance center for the exile community. For many, the tower provided nothing less than their freedom from Castro and the hardships Cuba had come to give them, rightly earning its name of the Freedom Tower. Rodriguez–Duarte’s family settled in Miami’s Little Havana community. At the age of 10, he was given his first camera by his grandfather, which led to his love affair with photography. Today, he is a New York and Miami-based internationally renowned photographer whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Town & Country, and Harper’s Bazaar, among other major publications, and has exhibited his work at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., Museum of the City of New York, The Victoria and Albert Museum in London and The Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach among others. Rodriguez-Duarte and his husband of 31 years, Tico Torres, have been documenting the Cuban diaspora since 1993. Torres, a photo stylist who is a master of the mise-en-scene, helped create with Rodriguez-Duarte the joyous image of Celia Cruz standing amid the towering palms of Fairchild Tropical Garden in a traditional ruffled Cuban gown. He was also there to set the mood in the London flat of Guillermo Cabrera Infante, one of Cuba’s most famous authors. Torres and his family were also among Cuban exiles who settled in Miami’s Hialeah community. Rodriguez-Duarte and Torres are thrilled to be returning together, full circle to the historic Freedom Tower for this inaugural exhibit, after separately setting foot there as immigrant children so many years before. The inaugural exhibition kicks off the Museum’s fall season scheduled for Friday, September 19, 2014 from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. in conjunction with SIDE BY SIDE: MDCULTURE STANDS AS ONE, a one night event held at the College’s historic Freedom Tower, featuring performances, exhibitions, film screenings, the public unveiling of 2014 Book Fair Poster, and the long awaited Cuban Exile Experience at the Freedom Tower. Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres will remain on display at the museum through August 30, 2015. All exhibitions are free and open to the public. MDC’s Freedom Tower was operated by the U.S. Government as a reception center for Cuban refugees from 1962 to 1974. “The building is significant because it represents the important story of the Cuban exodus to America and resettlement during the Cold War,” reports the U.S. Department of the Interior, which has also called the Freedom Tower the “Ellis Island of the South.” Though it operated in that capacity for only 12 years, the building has become an icon representing the faith that democracy brought to troubled lives, the generosity of the American people and a hopeful beginning that assured thousands a new life in a new land. WHAT: Cuba Out of Cuba: Through the Lens of Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte in Collaboration with Tico Torres WHEN: Friday, September 19 –Opening Reception from 6 – 9 p.m. September 19, 2014 – August 30, 2015 Museum Hours: Wednesday – Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. WHERE: MDC Museum of Art + Design Cultural Legacy Gallery The Freedom Tower at MDC, First Floor 600 Biscayne Blvd. About MDC Museum of Art + Design MDC Museum of Art + Design (MOAD) is Miami Dade College’s flagship institution dedicated to the presentation and exhibition of visual art and design, housed at the National Historic Landmark Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College in Downtown Miami. The mission of the Museum is to promote the appreciation and understanding of art and its role in society through direct engagement with original works of art from within the College’s extensive permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. Furthermore, the Museum presents year-round lectures, symposiums and art related events to expose, educate and engage the greater public through related creative processes. The MDC Museum of Art + Design provides its patrons and visitors access to unique cultural, historical and educational exhibitions that enrich the greater community while building and preserving an expansive permanent art collection. Miami Dade College has been collecting art since the 1960s. Over the years, the collection has grown contain more than 1,600 works in all mediums and genres, specifically within the movements of minimalism, pop art of the ’60s and ’70s, conceptual art and contemporary Latin American art. The College and Museum actively acquire works by emerging and under-recognized artists, as well as major figures in modern, post-modern and contemporary art. About The Cuban Exile Experience & Cultural Legacy Gallery The Cuban Exile Experience & Cultural Legacy Gallery is a historical division of the MDC Museum of Art + Design. In addition to visual arts, the Museum supports exhibitions and programs that collect, preserve, research and interpret stories and artifacts that help build a better community understanding and appreciation of the Freedom Tower’s history. For more information about the exhibition, events or VIP Opening Reception at MDC Museum of Art + Design, please contact the Museum at 305-237-7722 or museum@mdc.edu. Event contacts: Juan Mendieta, 305-237-7611, jmendiet@mdc.edu, MDC communications director Tere Estorino Florin, 305-237-3949, testorin@mdc.edu, MDC media relations director Roxana Romero, 305-237-3366, rromero3@mdc.edu, media specialist Sue Arrowsmith, 305-237-3710, sue.arrowsmith@mdc.edu, media specialist Alejandro Rios, 305-237-7482, arios1@mdc.edu

José Antonio Amaro Reyes

General Information
Current Name
Jose Antonio Amaro Reyes
Current Location
United States of America
Name on Arrival
José Antonio Amaro Reyes
Age on Arrival
13
Date of Arrival
Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Relocated To
CWB Matecumbe

José Antonio's Story

Remarks:An English translation is provided below for non-Spanish speaking relatives and friends.

Nací en el antiguo municipio de Holguín de la antigua provincia de Oriente en el año 1948. Fui bauti...

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Oye lo unico capas que el PENDE SE FUERA A FAJARSE era por el lugar donde el se tenia que sentarse a comer en el campamento. fijate que la historia de CUBA DISE que el primer PENDE que hubo en CUBA que era bisabuelo de el disen que cuando MASEO llego a su pueblo y toco la corneta en ese pueblo para recrutar mambisis el pariente de el siguio durmiendo.

Message by Fernando L Collado Gonzalez | Sep 3rd 2009

Compay Pepe Anton: Ya que se ha impuesto un poco la calma, gracias a la intervención de Carmen, nuestra seria hermana mayor, quiero ponerte aquí algo que a todos nos conviene recordar. AP Highlight in History: On Sept. 3, 1939, Britain and France declared war on Germany, two days after the Nazi invasion of Poland. Also, there was an article in the AP reporting on a service of thanksgiving held Tuesday at St. Paul's Cathedral in London, attended by over 2,000 people "to remember the thousands of children who were evacuated to the countryside to protect them from German bombs during WWII.--- Over 1.8 million British schoolchildren, vulnerable people and mothers with babies were evacuated the first days of September, 1939. Evacuations continued throughout the war -a total of 3.5 million children [were sent] to stay with families they had never met before. For some children the wrench of leaving home was mitigated by new experiences." I have a British friend here who was one of those children. When she told me about it aome time ago, I told her about our pedro pan experience, and we talked about the obvious parallels. Life on Earth seems to be variations on the same themes repeating over and over, like a Phillip Glass composition. When will we ever learn that we need to change play better tunes?

Message by Yolanda Cardenas Ganong | Sep 3rd 2009

Gracias Jose Antonio, Glad to be of help. Carmencita la Santica.

Message by Carmen Valdivia | Sep 3rd 2009

¡Al fin se calmó el gallinero!

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Sep 3rd 2009

Frankly, you can pull out now and we'll leave you alone but.....YOU ARE GOING TO MISS US!!!!

Message by Susy Rodriguez | Sep 3rd 2009

Marcos, los buenos consejos se dan a tiempo. Los consejos atrasados son de por sí moralejas. La próxima vez, favor de aconsejarme a tiempo. Gracias por la observación. José Antonio.

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Sep 3rd 2009

¡Qué despretigio, damas y caballeros! ¡Pero qué despretigio! Las malas lenguas me hacen blanco de calumnias sin fundamento. Ya me dan por descendiente de Rasputín cuando soy biznieto de isleños. ¡De qué vale ser respetuoso y medir palabras! ¡Qué gente!

Message by Marcia Caridad Ramos Gonzalez | Sep 3rd 2009

Pepe fiera ya volviste de CUBA? desde que estbas en FLORIDA CITY todo el mundo sabia que tu eras a DOUBLE AGENT [ INFILTRADO para el resto de la comunida cubana que no sepa lo que significa eso] . El pende siempre me lo dijo ten cuidado lo que digas delante de PEPE. QUE te puede chivatiar. pero yo siempre pense que el estaba hablando de los HOUSE PARENTS . QUE TONTO FUI. BUENO cuentame como te fue por la ISLA viste RAUL? BYE FERNANDO

Message by Fernando L Collado Gonzalez | Sep 3rd 2009

Pepito al fin y al cabo, tiras la piedra y escondes la mano. Quien tu sabes me ( y si tu no sabes quien, menos se yo) conto que tu habias empezado todo esto. Si, escribiendo muy bonito, utilizando palabras muy elaboradas, etc. etc. cuando de verdad todo era un conspiracy para formar todo esto. Por cierto, que pena me da lo que me dijistes de Marcos y Yolanda. I would have never thought y mucho menos viniendo de Carmen V.

Message by Susy Rodriguez | Sep 3rd 2009

Compay, el consejo de Susy ha llegado tarde. Ya estás hasta las orejas en la olla de grillos. ¿Te has reído tanto como yo? Entre lágrimas de risa y lágrimas de sentimiento me voy a deshidratar. Si llego a la reunión hecha una pasa, va a ser culpa de los grillos. --Y todavía dice Marcos que doy latigazos -with a wet noodle, maybe. El es uno de los grillos que me van a provocar un soponcio a mí, vieja y achacosa que estoy acá lejos... tu c o m a y .........

Message by Yolanda Cardenas Ganong | Sep 3rd 2009

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