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High court to hear dispute about TV over Internet

 
FILE - This July 7, 2010 file photo shows Barry Diller  at the annual Allen & Co. Media summit in Sun Valley, Idaho. Thirty years after failing to persuade the Supreme Court of the threat posed by home video recordings, big media companies are back at the high court to try to rein in another technological innovation that they say threatens their financial well-being. The battle has moved out of viewers’ living rooms, where Americans once marveled at their ability to pop a cassette into a recorder and capture their favorite programs or the game they wouldn’t be home to see. Now the entertainment conglomerates that own U.S. television networks are waging a legal fight, with Supreme Court argument on Tuesday, against a start-up business that uses Internet-based technology to give subscribers the ability to watch programs anywhere they can take portable devices. The source of the companies’ worry is Aereo Inc., which takes free television signals from the airwaves and sends them over the Internet to paying subscribers in 11 cities. Aereo, backed by media billionaire Barry Diller, has plans to more than double that total.

Thirty years after failing to convince the Supreme Court of the threat posed by home video recordings, big media companies are back and now trying to rein in another technological innovation they say threatens their financial well-being.

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This photo taken Jan. 31, 2014, shows Lesly Hernandez, a senior at Jack E. Singley Academy in Irving, Texas, and a member of the small school club, girls of technology, picking up her little brother, Kevin, 5, right, at his elementary school after class while their mother is at work. Girls of technology is a small club of girls at Singley aiming for a career in technology. Hernandez takes on many extra-curricular activities including sports, robotics club, and the girls of technology club while at the same time helping to take care of her younger brother.

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