US: Militants beheaded Sotloff after Foley

 

AP National Security Writer

A U.S. intelligence analysis has concluded that American journalist Steven Sotloff was beheaded by Islamic State militants at some point after a similar killing of another U.S. reporter.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki (SAH'-kee) said Wednesday it's still not clear exactly when or where Sotloff was killed. An online video of his beheading was released Tuesday.

Psaki cited unspecified signs that the video of Sotloff was taken at least some time after an earlier recording of militants beheading journalist James Foley. The video of Foley was released two weeks ago.

Sotloff's mother pleaded for his life late last week after the Foley video surfaced.

The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for both beheadings and is believed to be holding several other Americans hostage.

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