Tropical Storm Dolly fades over northern Mexico

 

The Associated Press

Tropical Storm Dolly drenched Mexico's Gulf coast before moving inland over mountains and dissipating on Wednesday.

The storm collapsed a street and house in the port city of Veracruz and prompted hundreds of schools to close in the states of Veracruz and Tamaulipas as it moved ashore late Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Norbert was whirling along Mexico's Pacific coast with maximum sustained winds of 70 mph (110 kph), and it was expected to grow into a hurricane before brushing past the Los Cabos resorts at the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula on Thursday or Friday.

Norbert was centered about 240 miles (385 kilometers) south of Los Cabos and it was moving west at 7 mph (11 kph). Mexico's National Meteorological Service warned it could bring intense rains to a broad swath of the western and central Mexico.

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