Fishing report

 

shermana@bellsouth.net

BEST BET

Captain Gil Gutierrez of Lucky Fishing Charters out of TNT Marina in Keystone reported that nighttime snapper fishing on the reefs offshore of Miami has been red hot. Plenty of mangrove, mutton and yellowtail snappers are biting cut bait over the reef in depths of 25 to 60 feet of water. Captain Bill Hauck from the party boat Sea King out of Marathon reported the nighttime mangrove snapper fishing on the reef is off the chart. Nighttime snapper anglers are having no problem catching a limit of snappers, which are eating ballyhoo and threadfin herring.

MIAMI-DADE/BROWARD

Captain John Baker from the charter boat Blue Waters II out of Miamarina at Bayside reported that eight miles offshore he was finding a lot of feeding schoolie dolphins. The dolphins were along scattered weed lines and under birds and ran in size from undersized to heavy lifters. Captain Dave Kostyo of Knot Nancy Charters out of TNT Marina reported nighttime tarpon action at Government Cut continues to produce.

KEYS

Captain Rick Rodriguez of Sea Horse Deep Sea Sport Fishing charters out of Islamorada reported his clients have been catching plenty of dolphin around the Humps offshore. During the Conch Fishing Tournament held in Islamorada, team Lady Blue, skippered by captain Ron Marrocco of Miami Shores, and mate Peter Stevens of Cooper City took top honors weighing in a 30-pound dolphin and a fly-caught, 22-pound dolphin. The team consisted of anglers Roland Nieman of Miami Shores and Bob Sherman of Naples. Team Lady Blue also released an estimated 120-pound white marlin that ate a skirted ballyhoo in 900 feet of water near the 409 Hump. Miami Shores resident Tom Benton took the top point’s award with his snapper and grouper catch.

TREASURE COAST

Captain Tom Van Horn of Mosquito Coast Charters reported sea trout, redfish and black drum have been cooperating nicely along the mangrove shorelines and over the shallow grass flats of the Indian River Lagoon. Pinfish schools have been thick, so soft plastic baits have worked best. Nedra Maxwell with the Sebastian Inlet District reported jetty fishermen are catching Spanish mackerel, a few small bonefish, catch-and-release snook and some nice-size permits. Offshore anglers will be looking for red snapper this weekend as well as gag groupers. A few large wahoo have been biting skirted ballyhoos 20 miles offshore.

FLORIDA BAY

Meagan Wirth of Aventura treated her father Scott of North Carolina and her boyfriend Anthony Cruz, also of Aventura, to a six-hour fishing adventure in Florida Bay out of Flamingo. During their charter, the three anglers had two Backcountry Slams. Caught on this day were seven slot-size redfish, four snook, mangrove snappers, ladyfish, jacks, bluefish and lemon and blacktip sharks to 125 pounds. The anglers fished with captain Alan Sherman of Get Em Sportfishing Charter. Captain Jason Sullivan of Rising Tide Charters reported the tarpon fishing out front of Flamingo has been hot.

SOUTHWEST COAST

Captain Rob Modys of Soul Mate Charters out of Fort Myers reported fishing in the backcountry in Estero Bay, his clients have been catching plenty of redfish and mangrove snappers along the mangrove shorelines and oyster bars on a moving high tide. Live shrimp has been the top bait. The passes are loaded with snappers, silver trout and a few pompano. Shrimp on a jig has been the top bait in the passes. Along the beaches, the shark fishing has been good.

FRESHWATER

Captain Michael Shellen of Shellen Guide Service out of Buck Head Ridge on Lake Okeechobee said a lot of rain, lightning storms and water temperatures reaching 90 degrees in some areas have had an effect on the freshwater fishing in his area. During early mornings when the shad are out, the bass fishing has been excellent. After the sun gets up, the shad disappear and the fishing shuts off. The areas around J&S on the east side, the Observation shoal on the west side and the Indian Prairie have had a lot of small bass to catch. Alan Zaremba of World Wide Peacock Bass charters said he has been hitting some of the smaller canals in the Glades and finding a good amount of largemouth bass. The fish are eating Chug Bugs and Pop R’s. In the local suburban canals, peacock bass were eating Blakemores Rooster tailed jigs.

Capt. Alan Sherman

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    Captain Pete Rapps of Captain Rapps’ Charters and Guides out of Chokoloskee reported snook are feeding on a good moving outgoing tide around the outside barrier islands. Live baits such as the pilchards, pinfish and threadfin herring and the DOA Terrorize soft plastics have been producing some of the best snook bites. Sea trout are feeding over grass in 3-5 feet of water. The redfish have been feeding along the oyster bars on the incoming tides. Popping corks with shrimp or pilchards have been getting a lot of the redfish strikes. Big tarpon are still around, holding in the open outside bays and flats, and have been feeding best during early mornings. Live baits such as small ladyfish, large threadfin herring, pinfish and mullet have been getting the most tarpon strikes.

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    Make plans to catch fish in the Mako Owners/Bass Pro Shops Fishing Funament, held Thursday through Sunday in Islamorada. TV personality George Poveromo will host. Entry fee is $100 per boat. A kickoff party will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Worldwide Sportsman. For more information, visit www.funaments.com.

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