Miami-Dade County

Miami-Dade mayor lets higher library-tax ceiling stand

 
 
Mayor Carlos Gimenez had requested to raise the library tax some, offsetting the increase with a lower fire-department rate. Commissioners went with an even higher library hike — though not as high as advocates wanted — to avoid layoffs and program cuts.
Mayor Carlos Gimenez had requested to raise the library tax some, offsetting the increase with a lower fire-department rate. Commissioners went with an even higher library hike — though not as high as advocates wanted — to avoid layoffs and program cuts.
Emily Michot / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

pmazzei@MiamiHerald.com

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez won’t veto a higher property tax rate ceiling for libraries set by county commissioners.

Mike Hernández, Gimenez’s spokesman, said Friday that the mayor decided to let the commission’s 8-5 vote from last week stand, even though that means the county’s overall tax rate could go against Gimenez’s wishes.

“He will continue to insist that Miami-Dade County government — and our library system — operate as efficiently as possible,” Hernández said.

Gimenez had until Friday to veto the commission’s decision.

A veto appeared unlikely once the mayor declared victory after the June 15 vote in which commissioners mostly agreed with Gimenez’s proposed tax rates. With the exception of libraries, commissioners signed off on Gimenez’s plan for the tax rates that fund the fire department and all other county services.

Gimenez had requested to raise the library tax some, offsetting the increase with a lower fire department rate. Commissioners went with an even higher library hike — though not as high as advocates wanted — to avoid layoffs and program cuts.

Commissioners will vote on the final tax rates and budget after two public hearings in September.

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