New signs to say 'Welcome to Sweet Home Alabama'

 

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The Associated Press

Tourists traveling into Alabama on interstate highways will soon be greeted by signs saying "Welcome to Sweet Home Alabama."

State tourism and transportation officials say the "Alabama The Beautiful" signs that have stood at the state line since 2003 will be replaced by the new "Sweet Home Alabama" signs over the next few months. Smaller versions of the signs will be on the grounds of the eight state welcome centers to serve as backdrops for travelers' photos.

Lynyrd Skynyrd recorded "Sweet Home Alabama" in 1973 in Doraville, Georgia, but Alabama has used the song title on car tags and in tourism promotions. State Tourism Director Lee Sentell says the song is recognized all over the world and the phrase "Sweet Home Alabama" makes people happy.

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