Police say Kennedy intruder was seeking Katy Perry

 

The Associated Press

A man accused of breaking into a home in the Kennedy compound on Cape Cod and telling authorities he was looking for singer Katy Perry has been sent to a mental health facility for evaluation.

James Lacroix, 53, of Mashpee, appeared in court Wednesday on a breaking and entering charge. A not guilty plea was entered for him, but a formal arraignment was delayed until Aug. 13.

Police in Barnstable, Massachusetts, responded to the home in the Hyannis Port section of town around 9:30 p.m. Tuesday after getting a call from Edward Kennedy Jr., the son of the late U.S. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, who had called from his home in Connecticut to check on his teenage son.

Kennedy said a strange man picked up the phone and identified himself using his real name.

Police responding to the Irving Avenue home found Lacroix in the kitchen. Video of the arrest showed him wearing camouflage shorts and a Captain America T-shirt.

The teen in the home apparently saw Lacroix reading a book but thought he was a friend of the family, Chief Paul MacDonald said. The teen was not harmed.

Lacroix's car had been parked outside for about three hours, neighbors told police.

At his hearing, a court psychologist told the judge Lacroix appeared to be having delusions and told her he had been treated for a psychotic disorder.

His attorney, Penelope Psomos, said Lacroix did not make any threats at the Kennedy home. The judge agreed he did not appear to be dangerous but ordered him to stay away from the Kennedy compound.

The more than 9,000-square-foot, nine-bedroom home, which was purchased by John F. Kennedy in 1956, was assessed this year at $2.11 million, according to town records. It is now owned by a family trust.

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