Man rescued from base of raging waterfall

 

Similar stories:

  • Man rescued from base of raging waterfall

The Associated Press

Sheriff's deputies and firefighters have rescued a man who was trapped in rushing water at the base of a southwestern Washington waterfall after his legs got caught in rocks.

The Skamania County sheriff's office said John Napierkowski, 19, was rescued Monday night in a pool near the bottom of Dougan Falls on the Washougal River.

Napierkowski had gone swimming with friends when his legs became trapped in big rocks at the bottom of the natural pool below the waterfall, Sheriff Dave Brown said Tuesday.

"The force of the water pushes you right into them," Brown said.

The sheriff's office received a call shortly after 8 p.m. that the Washougal man was trapped in chest-deep water in the popular swimming hole.

"The first thing we do is try to keep him above water," Brown said

Emergency crews tied ropes to the man, and also gave him a life jacket, Brown said. Then they gave him a harness and attached an additional rope.

"First responders then began pulling on the rope from upriver and were able to free Napierkowski," said a press release from the sheriff's office.

Napierkowski was taken to a hospital because he was trapped in the water for about an hour and was lethargic from the cold. Brown estimated the water temperature at 60 degrees or less.

"The water was putting a beat down on his body," Brown said.

The incident occurred about 30 miles east of the Portland, Oregon, area.

Napierkowski, who could not be immediately reached for comment, is not the first person to become trapped in the area below the falls. Four years ago, a 14-year-old boy from Wilsonville, Oregon, got his leg trapped between boulders in the river below Dougan Falls. The water in that case reached to the boy's nose before he was rescued.

Read more Nation Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Arizona Department of Corrections shows inmate Joseph Rudolph Wood. The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, July 22, 2014, allowed the Arizona executionof Wood to go forward amid a closely watched First Amendment fight over the secrecy surrounding lethal injection drugs in the country.

    First Amendment fight won't stop Arizona execution

    The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for Arizona to carry out its third execution in the past year Wednesday following a closely watched First Amendment fight over the secrecy surrounding lethal injection drugs.

  •  
Arlene Holmes, mother of Aurora theater shooting suspect James Holmes, walks back into court at the Arapahoe County Justice Center for a hearing in the 2012 Colorado movie theatre shooting case, Tuesday, July 22, 2014 in Centennial, Colo. The court will look at setting a new trial date in the case against James Holmes.

    Holmes in court for hearing on expert testimony

    The man charged with the Colorado theater massacre is returning to court for the second day of hearings about what kinds of experts can testify at his trial.

  •  
Israeli soldiers kneel during a drill near the Israel and Gaza border, Tuesday, July 22, 2014. Israeli airstrikes pummeled a wide range of targets in the Gaza Strip on Tuesday as the U.N. chief and the U.S. secretary of state began an intensive effort to end more than two weeks of fighting that has killed hundreds of Palestinians and dozens of Israelis.

    Gaza families plead for evacuation amid battle

    Dozens of Palestinian families trapped by clashes between Hamas militants and Israeli troops are scrambling to flee a southern Gaza Strip neighborhood as Israel reported that two more of its soldiers have died in the conflict.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category