Never mind SARS or MERS, worry about measles

 

Los Angeles Times

As Americans head off on summer vacations this year, federal health authorities are keeping a wary eye out for an unwanted traveler: one of the most contagious infectious diseases in the world.

The microscopic droplets that spread this virus can remain suspended in the air for up to two hours, and virtually all of those without immunity who are exposed will catch it. Most of those who become ill will, after an incubation period that ranges from eight to 12 days, develop a fever and a characteristic rash. Some patients, with children being the most vulnerable, will develop pneumonia or encephalitis, which can lead to brain damage or death.

I’m talking about measles.

This potentially fatal, vaccine-preventable infectious disease was practically eradicated in the United States a decade ago, thanks to high vaccination rates. But in May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a sobering report of a dramatic uptick in measles cases in the United States this year. Some 539 cases have been reported as of June 27, according to the CDC, the highest number in 20 years. In 2011, which had the second-highest number of measles cases in recent decades, the CDC reported fewer than 200 cases for the entire year.

Other parts of the world are seeing even larger outbreaks, and there is a growing concern that Americans returning home after overseas vacations will push the numbers here higher, too.

Screening of air travelers for infectious diseases is impractical and ineffective, as the H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009 to 2010 demonstrated. In part, this is because passengers can be contagious with an infectious illness long before they are symptomatic.

If all this sounds frightening, it doesn’t have to be — at least where measles is concerned. A simple, safe and effective vaccine conveys immunity to most who receive it.

But a persistent mistrust in vaccinations has led to pockets of the un-immunized, despite the extraordinary success and safety of childhood vaccination. Thousands of parents on both sides of the Atlantic continue to refuse or delay selected vaccines, including the one for measles.

In California and Vermont, for example, the number of incoming kindergartners fully immunized against measles dropped from 93 percent in 2005 to 83 percent in 2010. And this isn’t just a problem at the low end of the socioeconomic spectrum. One public school in Malibu, Calif., for example, reported to the state that more than 40 percent of its kindergartners weren’t fully vaccinated.

A recent commentary in the New England Journal of Medicine by Dr. Douglas Diekema pointed out that although some parents object to immunization on religious or philosophical grounds, many don’t vaccinate their children because they believe that the benefits of immunizations don’t justify the risks. This is totally unsupported by scientific and clinical evidence.

In a sense, immunization programs have been a victim of their own success. Because of vaccinations, Americans today have little experience with vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles. As a result, they cannot easily appreciate the benefits of vaccination or the risks associated with not vaccinating.

The challenge from a public health standpoint is to figure out how to disseminate that knowledge more effectively. We need to redouble our efforts. One important step would be for state and federal public health agencies to undertake a robust social networking and media campaign on vaccinations. This shouldn’t be too difficult. The CDC, for example, has excellent information on its website about the risk of measles during this travel season, but the information is not readily available on social media and is likely to be missed by most travelers.

When new diseases such as MERS or SARS pop up, travelers besiege doctors with questions about how they can protect themselves and their families. But some of those same people are failing to take time-tested precautions against more familiar killers like measles. Each one of us is a stakeholder in community and global health. And in this era of globalization, when people fly frequently to distant parts of the world, infectious disease threats can occur overnight and without notice. We owe it to our children and our communities to protect ourselves.

Dr. Mark Gendreau is the vice chairman of emergency medicine at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center and an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Tufts University.

©2014 Los Angeles Times

Read more From Our Inbox stories from the Miami Herald

  • A GOP ultimatum to Vlad

    With the party united, the odds are now at least even that the GOP will not only hold the House but also capture the Senate in November.

  • College cost not big problem for poor students

    To judge by this summer’s banner policy proposals, the most important question for higher-education reform right now is giving students easier access to loans. But evidence from Canada suggests those changes won’t address the greater need: Getting more kids from poor families into college, the key to moving up in an increasingly unequal society.

  • Torture is not a public relations problem

    The CIA is on a “charm offensive.”

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category