US appeals granting of new trial to ex-BP engineer

 

Associated Press

Federal prosecutors are appealing a judge's decision to grant a new trial to a former BP engineer convicted of obstructing justice in an investigation of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

The notice of appeal in the case of Kurt Mix was filed Friday in U.S. District Court, where Mix was tried, and at the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Prosecutors accused Mix of deliberately deleting text messages to and from a supervisor and a BP contractor about the amount of oil flowing from BP's Macondo well after the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion.

In June, U.S. District Judge Stanwood Duval threw out Mix's December 2013 conviction and granted him a new trial. He ruled that a jury forewoman tainted the deliberations by mentioning to a deadlocked jury that she had heard something outside the trial that affirmed her view of Mix's guilt.

Mix's new trial currently is set for Aug. 18, although the appeal could change that.

Prosecutors say Mix deleted the text messages in order to stymie a grand jury investigation of the spill.

Mix's attorneys have argued there is ample evidence he shared information about the flow rate throughout the government investigation. They also said prosecutors failed to prove that Mix knew the information he deleted would be pertinent to a grand jury investigation — an investigation they said he did not know about and that had not yet even begun.

Read more Business Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
In this photo taken on Tuesday, July 15, 2014, insurance agent Jo Ann Charron, left, talks with her administrative assistant Enedelia Morales during a meeting about details on a clients' insurance coverage at the Benefits Dallas offices in Dallas. Some consumers who purchased insurance under the new health law are confused because they received varying subsidy amounts and are now stuck in lengthy appeals processes trying to figure out which estimate if accurate. Charron said the different estimates her clients received varied between $50 to $100 a month.

    Varying health premium subsidies worry consumers

    Linda Close was grateful to learn she qualified for a sizable subsidy to help pay for her health insurance under the new federal law. But in the process of signing up for a plan, Close said her HealthCare.gov account showed several different subsidy amounts, varying as much as $180 per month.

  • Audit: NASA doesn't have the money for big rockets

    NASA doesn't have enough money to get its new, $12 billion rocket system off the ground by the end of 2017 as planned, federal auditors say.

  •  
FILE - This april 28, 2011 file photo shows Charles Thompson, of the Humane Society of North Texas, holds an albino reticulated python in Fort Worth, Texas.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed strict nationwide limits on importing and shipping boa constrictors and four other snake species. The rules would prohibit bringing the snakes, including reticulated pythons, into the country and shipping them between states except for scientific and educational purposes. The agency wants to prevent them from being introduced into the wild.(AP Photo/Star-Telegram, Ron T. Ennis, file)  (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, )  MAGS OUT; (FORT WORTH WEEKLY, 360 WEST); INTERNET OUT

    US wildlife officials propose limiting snake trade

    Federal wildlife officials recently proposed strict nationwide limits on importing and shipping boa constrictors and four other snake species in an effort to prevent them from being introduced into the wild.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category