Carolyn Hax

Carolyn Hax: New mom’s worried about bullies

 

Adapted from a recent online discussion.

Dear Carolyn: With all the bullying in the news these days, I’m wondering (as the mom of a 15-month-old) if you have any advice for raising children who don’t bully, and who don’t allow others to bully them.

Wondering

Sure, I’ll dash that off in 500 words.

1. Even if we figure out the exact answer, your child will be on the giving and receiving end of meanness. There’s no avoiding it altogether. Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children (Thompson/O'Neill-Grace/Cohen), which I recommend often, is very clear and reassuring on this. Kids have to learn how to get along just as they have to learn to walk, and the process isn’t pretty sometimes.

2. How are you at tightrope-walking? To raise kids who don’t bully, you need to supervise them carefully and correct them as needed, like when they say mean things to people’s faces or behind their backs: “Hey — how would you feel if someone said that to/about you?” To raise kids who don’t allow others to bully them, you need to teach your kids to assert themselves instead of your doing it for them. It’s a constant balancing and rebalancing act as they grow, but it hinges on learning to step in only when their own defenses aren’t strong enough to protect them (with abusive relatives, for example). Bonus: You don’t know whether you’ve gotten it right until it’s almost too late to do anything about it. And, different kids/temperaments/personalities need different balances.

3. Another kind of balance matters, too — between their feeling important to you, and their not being misled into thinking they’re the center of the earth. Your home needs to be a safe place for them to express their feelings and try new things (which will include trying on the idea of being mean to you) and to be significant, but you also need to be the boss. And, the wide, wide world also needs to figure in their education. They need to get out, see others unlike them, give of themselves to others, get introduced to big ideas.

All this and more. (I opened a reader-discussion forum on it, too: bit.ly/BullyBGone.)

Re: Bullying: Also important is the behavior you model for your kids.

There are so many subtle ways people “bully” others. Many families have a member who is “teased” constantly. Even if the people doing the teasing think it is “in good fun,” this sends the message that picking on people is not a big deal.

That is a problem.

Anonymous

Good point, thanks. This is an extension of the home-as-safe-place point I made, but it’s important enough to warrant breaking it out. In a two-parent home, the respect in that relationship is on display at all times, too, especially when everyone’s guard is down.

Email Carolyn at tellme@washpost.com, follow her on Facebook at facebook.com/carolyn.hax or chat with her online at noon Eastern time each Friday at washingtonpost.com.

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