Endangered bats have been spotted feeding at a Coral Gables golf course

  • A Florida bonneted bat flies over the Coral Gables Granada golf course on Monday June 23, 2014. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • FIU student Giselle Hosein checks on a recording device on the Coral Gables Granada golf course. The recorder is used to capture sounds of the Florida bonneted bat. The bats have found an unlikely home on the Granada golf course. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • FIU student Giselle Hosein checks on a recording device on the Coral Gables Granada golf course. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Florida International University student Giselle Hosein searches the darkening sky for the Florida bonneted bat at the Coral Gables Granada golf course. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • FIU student Giselle Hosein searches the darkening sky for the Florida bonneted bat. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Florida International University professor Kisi Bohn tries to locate sounds emitted from the Florida bonneted bat at the Coral Gables Granada golf course. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • FIU Professor Kisi Bohn tries to locate sounds emitted from the Florida bonneted bat at the Coral Gables Granada golf course. PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The Florida Bonneted Bat. JOHN PENDYGRAFT / TAMPA TIMES

  • Zoo workers named the rescued bat Clyde, a nod to the only Florida bonneted bat in captivity named Bonnie, which is kept by the Florida Bat Conservancy in Tampa. Adult bonneted bats have about a 20-inch wing span, far larger than other Florida bats. DUSTIN SMITH / ZOO MIAMI

  • A rare bat found only in South Florida and in danger of extinction has been spotted feeding at a Coral Gables golf course. DUSTIN SMITH / ZOO MIAMI

  • Staff at Zoo Miami nursed the male bat back to health before releasing it in Coral Gables. DUSTIN SMITH / ZOO MIAMI