Heat notebook

Miami Heat’s Chris Bosh relying on perimeter game

 
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Miami Heat center Chris Bosh hits a three-pointer over Indiana Pacers forward Luis Scola during the second quarter of Game 3 of the NBA Eastern Conference Finals basketball game at the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami on Saturday, May 24, 2014.
Miami Heat center Chris Bosh hits a three-pointer over Indiana Pacers forward Luis Scola during the second quarter of Game 3 of the NBA Eastern Conference Finals basketball game at the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami on Saturday, May 24, 2014.
David Santiago / Staff Photo

bjackson@MiamiHerald.com

The Heat’s desire for spacing and Chris Bosh’s ability to hit threes are the primary reasons why Bosh spends less time in the post than he ever has. But Bosh admitted Saturday there’s another deterrent to playing more in the post.

“For some odd reason, I always get double-teamed still,” he said. “I don’t understand it. And that’s the reason I really stopped, because every time I go down there and get double-teamed, it’s like, ‘For what?’ They won’t double-team LeBron James, but they’ll double-team me?”

Asked when he realized that banging in the post wasn’t his strength, he cracked: “When I found out you could get one more point for shooting threes.”

But seriously …

“It gets tiring, what they ask us to do,” he said of the demands placed on him in the Heat’s defensive system.

Bosh isn’t complaining but said those responsibilities include “to blitz the screen and roll every single one. Close out and get back. I was already 20 to 30 pounds lighter than everybody else. All that stuff takes my energy.”

Bosh attempted only 67 shots on postups this season — a number that has declined every season with the Heat, from 240 to 190 to 131. By contrast, James took 188 shots on postups this season.

Bosh hit 55.9 percent of his attempts on postups, compared with less than 42 percent shooting on postups over the past three seasons.

Bosh, sticking mostly to the perimeter, had another slow start in Game 3, with two points on 1-of-5 shooting in the first half. He played just nine first-half minutes because of foul trouble.

THIS AND THAT

•  Michael Beasley replaced Greg Oden on the Heat’s inactive list, along with Justin Hamilton.

• Forward Shane Battier, who is retiring after the season, was named the NBA’s Teammate of the Year in a vote by players throughout the league. Players could not vote for their own teammates.

Battier called it “one of the biggest honors of my life. … Everything I do, I try to make that locker room, this team, better.”

He said there are “arguments or disagreements” in the Heat’s locker room “but every last guy in the locker room has his teammate’s back.”

• Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said Battier is the first player he has ever coached who asked the coaching staff for a detailed printout of opposing player tendencies before games.

“It’s not like we don’t go to extensive lengths with our preparation,” Spoelstra said. “That goes back 19 years. Then to have a player come to us and say, ‘This isn’t enough. I need more.’ That absolutely caught our attention. Our staff absolutely loved it.”

•  Dwyane Wade, on why the Big 3 hasn’t worried about their future (all have early termination clauses this summer): “If we were in a position where we were a team going through a lot of turmoil and wasn’t living up to expectations and guys was unhappy — if we was going through all that, it’d be a different mind-set.”

• Tidbits: The Heat will select 26th and 55th in the June NBA Draft. … Wade entered Game 3 with 152 blocks, the second-most by a guard in NBA postseason history behind Michael Jordan (158). … Game 3 was the 150th playoff games of James’ career. He entered with 97 wins in his first 149 games. Jordan won 99 of his first 150 playoff games.

Barry Jackson

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