The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) turn 50

  • Picture taken in the 60's of one of the founders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), late former leader Manuel Marulanda, aka Tirofijo, during combat following an attack at their camp in Marquretalia, in the Colombian department of Tolima. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. -- / AFP/Getty Images

  • Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) rebels stand in formation during a practice ceremony for the Boliviarian Movement, a new clandestine political party for the rebels, outside of San Vicente del Caguan in the FARC controlled zone of Colombia on Friday, April 28, 2000. The FARC are Colombia's oldest and largest rebel group numbering over 15,000 rebels, and will officialy begin the political party Saturday. Scott Dalton / AP Photo

  • Picture taken in the 70's of two the founders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), late former leaders Manuel Marulanda (L), aka Tirofijo, and Luis Alberto Morantes Jaimes (R), aka Jacobo Arenas, embracing after drinking aguardiente (eau-de-vie) somewhere in the Colombian mountainous region. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. -- / AFP/Getty Images

  • Picture taken in the 70's of two the founders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), late former leaders Manuel Marulanda (L), aka Tirofijo, and Luis Alberto Morantes Jaimes, aka Jacobo Arenas, somewhere in the Colombian mountainous region. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. -- / AFP/Getty Images

  • Picture taken in the 60's of Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) fighters during training at a camp somewhere in the Colombian mountainous region. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. -- / AFP/Getty Images

  • Picture taken in the 60's of one of the founders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), late former leader Manuel Marulanda, aka Tirofijo, somewhere in the Colombian mountainous region. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. -- / AFP/Getty Images

  • FILE: Relatives of some of the 67 soldiers taken hostage by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) during an attack on the Las Delicias military base in Caqueta, Colombia, on August 30, 1996 take part in a rally asking for their release in downtown Bogota, on October 3, 1996. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. MEREDITH DAVENPORT / AFP/Getty Images

  • FILE: Coffins of 14 of the 58 soldiers killed during combats with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrilla are carried during an official ceremony in Florencia, in the Colombian department of Caqueta, on March 10, 1998. The 50th anniversary of the uprising by the FARC -- which led to a conflict responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths and displacing some five million people -- will be marked on May 27, 2014. The Marxist-inspired FARC, currently holding peace talks with the Colombia government, is Latin America's largest and longest-fighting insurgency. PEDRO UGARTE / AFP/Getty Images

  • FILE: Manuel Marulanda, the founder and top leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) arrives to Los Pozos, in the southern rebel controlled area, for a second meeting aimed at salvaging peace talks with Colombia's President Andres Pastrana in this Feb. 9, 2001 photo. Government peace commissioner Camilo Gomez announced Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2002 that leftist rebels appear to have abandoned peace talks aimed at ending the country's civil war and that the rebels would hand over a huge safe haven the government granted them within 48 hours. RICARDO MAZALAN / AP

  • FILE: Former hostage Ingrid Betancourt, center, embraces her husband Juan Carlos Lecompte as her mother Yolanda Pulecio, left, looks on upon Betancourt's arrival to a military base in Bogota after being rescued from six years of captivity, Wednesday, July 2, 2008. Betancourt is one of 15 hostages rescued by Colombia's military from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. Betancourt was abducted by the FARC when running for president in Feb. 2002. Fernando Vergara / ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • FILE: Colombia's president-elect, Andres Pastrana, second from left, poses with leaders of the country s oldest and most powerful leftist rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), during a meeting in Colombia's mountains Thursday, June 9, 1998. Left to right are Jorgue Briceno, a ranking FARC military commander, Pastrana, Manuel Marulanda, a top leader of FARC, and Victor G. Ricardo, Pastrana's negotiator. Pastrana's Press Office / ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • FILE: Jorge Briceno, commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), makes his round on 27 June 2001 in the tiny rebel-held town of La Macarena, on the eve of a carefully staged release of several hundred troops held captive for the past three years. Colombia's army said on September 23, 2010 that it has killed Jorge Briceno Suarez, who is also known as Victor Julio Suarez Rojas and the alias Mono Jojoy, the head of FARC's military operations. RODRIGO ARANGUA / AFP/Getty Images

  • Dogs chase a helicopter in La Julia, Colombia, on May 21, 2014. Although the nearest town is 32 miles away, the military says the road is too dangerous to travel and rely on helicopters for transportation Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • A Colombian soldier patrols the town of Uribe, Meta, a longtime FARC stronghold, on May 21, 2014. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • Soldiers practice loading artillery in La Julia, Colombia, on May 21, 2014. The town is a longtime FARC stronghold that has repeatedly come under attack. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • A Colombian soldier registers identity cards on May 21, 2014, in the one-time FARC stronghold of Uribe. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • Colombian soldiers put up a poster in Uribe on May 21, 2014, encouraging FARC guerrillas to defect. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • A soldier in La Julia, Colombia shows off a model of an anti-personnel mine used by FARC guerrillas, on May 21, 2014. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • Villagers cross a river in La Julia, Colombia, on May 21, 2014. A bridge that was supposed to be completed three years ago is only partially built. The military blames extortion by FARC guerrillas for scaring off the contractors. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald

  • A woman serves coffee in La Julia, Colombia, on May 22, 2014. The army says it’s slowly reclaiming the town, which was once a stronghold of FARC guerrillas. Juan Manuel Barrero Bueno / Special to the Miami Herald