Retailers are working to attract shoppers with entertainment and efficiencies

 

Bradenton Herald

Shopping centers and retailers want to give people an experience they can't get with a click of the mouse.

Consumers want to do something or feel like they're getting treatment they couldn't get anywhere else.

"The challenge for the bricks and mortar developer is to give people a reason to come to their store as opposed to just go to the Internet where Amazon can ship something in a day," said Rob Wheeler, chief executive officer of Sembler Company, a St. Petersburg-based provider of retail real estate services.

Books, video games and office supplies, for the most part, have become more preferred in electronic format, but folks still need to buy the necessities -- or have a little fun.

After all, shopping has always had an element of entertainment combined with a little therapy -- the challenge now is to make an experience you can't get online but maintaining all those online efficiencies you might want.

Read more here

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