Business Plan Challenge list of finalists and semifinalists

 

Here are the finalists in the 2014 Miami Herald Business Plan Challenge:

COMMUNITY TRACK

Cirrus Pos, by Robert Vasquez, Christopher Hoffman and John Alicea, is a point of sale application affordable for a small single restaurant but powerful enough to manage large restaurants and franchises.

Feel Good’s, by Steve Capellini and Patricia Woodson, provides the spa experience in a novel manner and unique environment, focusing on community involvement and technological integration.

Lil Stems, by Judith Felix, is a learning enrichment center in Broward County that focuses on STEM education for minority children, ages 5 to 10.

Melt Haus, by Michelle Varat, Andy Varat and David Smith, is a website where customers merge fashionable garments with digital images using an easy online tool. Melt Haus transfers the image to the garment.

Miami Exchange, by Catherine Penrod and Audrey M. Nelligan, is a contact center business for small businesses, with a keen focus on healthcare service providers.

Playapy, by Amy Baez, is a child development resource for parents and educators created and supported by pediatric therapy professionals.

Play Corner, by Madeleine Funes and George Moss, provides a safe search process and enables kids to browse content on touch-screen devices independently, through a kid-friendly design.

Snapscore, by Ryan Del Rosal, Newt Porter and Taylor Auerbach, measures individuals’ qualifications and provides meaningful insights to accelerate their careers. Similar to a credit score, Snapscore is a baseline of their current professional merit.

Star and Moon Books, by Saba Haq, is an upcoming online retailer of Islamic children’s books and toys geared toward American Muslims.

Stylize, by Sara Fiedelholtz, creates a fashionable line of sunglasses with easily interchangeable looks, and has partnered with an optical manufacturer.

FIU TRACK

Moonlighter, by Daisy Nodal and Tom Pupo, is a tech cafe and lounge that allows local designers, entrepreneurs and the public to co-create, prototype and retail new products.

Recall Safe, by Steven A. Rojas Tallon, is focused on alerting consumers directly of recalls and safety warnings, seeking to change the entire process and help avoid preventable injuries or deaths.

HIGH SCHOOL TRACK

Amplify, by Adam Chiavacci, Daniel Stein and Jack Davis of Ransom Everglades, would link up to six phones together so the host smartphone playing music can utilize all the other phones’ speakers as though it were its own.

FoodNection, by Gavin Sitkoff-Vuong and Sabrina Ibarra of Ransom Everglades, will connect chefs, restaurants and passionate foodies through a web platform and app.

Maestro Rhythm, by Annabel Chyung of Ransom Everglades, is a game app that will help both beginner and advanced musicians triumph over their frustrations with rhythm.

PurchaSync, by Ryan Amoils and Alvaro Ortega of Miami Country Day, is a smartphone app for digital receipts that also eases corporate reimbursement and income tax itemizing.

Reel Cause, by Andrew and Edward Hurowitz of University School of NSU, provides affordable video production services to help small- and mid-size nonprofits get their messages out.

Tutor Talk, by Bradley Jackson of Ransom Everglades, is the Yelp for SAT/ACT tutors, with a social mission of offering free tutoring to those in need.

YDatabase, by Yeyenne Telisme of Miami Edison, is a service business that will help create databases for small businesses to help them affordably manage their operations.

Read more Business Plan Challenge stories from the Miami Herald

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