Pelosi on Benghazi panel: 'We want to show...how unfair this process is'

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

House Democrats are divided on how to proceed with the special Benghazi committee created last week--and Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi is still mulling what to do.

"The point is we want to show the public how unfair this process is.  It should be evenly divided," she told CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer" Wednesday. "We said should have equal access to witnesses.  They said you may not even ever have access to witnesses."

The committee will have seven Republicans and five Democrats. Pelosi wants 50-50, though when she was speaker in 2007, she backed creation of a special global warming panel with more Democrats than Republicans.

Pelosi, D-Calif., told CNN "I think what they have in mind is to control the documents, to control the witnesses, come to their own conclusions.  We'll have to make a decision as to what the best way is to showcase their unfairness."

Blitzer pointed out that the committee is "a done deal."

Pelosi promised, "I'll make a decision about it.  I just want to show the terms under which we would go in or not go in."

Asked when she'd decide, Pelosi said, "When I do."

She pointed out Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, suggested they meet before proceeding, and they have not yet had that meeting. The House is in a recess this week and returns Monday.

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