McCain: Send U.S. troops to rescue kidnapped girls in Nigeria

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., wants to see more than hashtag messages voicing displeasure over the abduction of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls by the terrorist group Boko Haram. He wants to see U.S. troops go into Nigera and rescue the girls, even if it means doing so without permission from the Nigerian government.

‘If they knew where they were, I certainly would send in U.S. troops to rescue them, in a New York minute I would, without the permission of the host country,’ McCain said Tuesday. Referring to Nigeria’s president, McCain added: ‘I wouldn’t be waiting for some kind of permission from some guy named Goodluck Jonathan.’

Thus far, the Obama administration has sent a team to Nigeria that includes FBI officials with hostage negotiation skills, five State Department officials, including a team leader, two strategic communications experts, a civiliam security expert and a regional medical support officer. There are also 10 Defense Department planners and advisers who were already in Nigeria and have been instructed to provide support to the kidnapping response, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney told reporters.

McCain, the 2008 Republican presidential nominee, said the United Nations’ charter gives the United States, the authority to mount a military resscue of the girls.

‘It’s a crine against humanity to kidnapped hundreds of young girls,’ McCain said. ‘That gives any nation, if they can, the license to stop a crime against humnanity, That’s the United Nations charter, not John McCain’s policy. It’s the same reason we should have, if we could have, gone in and freed the people of Auschwitz and Dachau.’

McCain said Obama shouldn’t worry about whether the Nigerian government would approve of disapprove of a U.S. military intervention into the country’s affairs. The president didn’t seek approval from Pakistan before he sent U.S. troops into that country to get Osama bin Laden.

‘I would not be involved in the niceties of getting the Nigerian government to agree, because if we rescue these people, there would be nothing but gratitude from the Nigerian government, such as it is,’ McCain said.

And Obama shouldn’t worry about what the Senate and the House of Representatives would say if he exercised his authority as commander-in-chief and sent American troops into Nigeria.

‘If we rescued these young girls, an appetite for that?’ McCain said ‘It be at the high point of the president’s popularity.’

Read more Politics Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2009, file photo, Florida Matt Patchan (71) and Marcus Gilbert (76) look on as Florida quarterback Tim Tebow lies on the turf after being sacked during an NCAA college football game against Kentucky in Lexington, Ky. Tebow received a concussion on the play that put him in the hospital for a night. The parties in a class-action head injury lawsuit against the NCAA that deals with concussion issues announced a settlement in a filing in federal court in Chicago on Tuesday, July 29, 2014.

    Summary of NCAA head injury settlement

    A filing in federal court in Chicago on Tuesday notified a U.S. district judge that lawyers for former college athletes and the NCAA reached a settlement in a class-action lawsuit after nearly a year of talks. Here's a rundown:

  •  
FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2009 file photo, Maine's Kyle Solomon (12) chases after New Hampshire's Kevin Kapstad, (5) during an NCAA college hockey game in Orono, Maine. Solomon is one of the plaintiffs in a class-action head injury lawsuit working its way through federal court in Chicago. The NCAA and the plaintiffs announced a settlement on Tuesday, July 29, 2014.

    APNewsBreak: NCAA settles head injury lawsuit

    The NCAA has agreed to settle a class-action head injury lawsuit by creating a $70 million fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports, The Associated Press has learned.

  • US home price gains slow for 6th straight month

    U.S. home prices rose in May from a year earlier at the weakest pace in 15 months, as home sales remain modest.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category