Fit tip: Sweets or fats?

 

ealvarez@MiamiHerald.com

Q: Which is worse: indulging in fatty foods or sweets?

A: To decide whether to indulge in fatty food or sweets (carbs) isn’t as clear-cut as you might think. We recommend getting your sweet fix from fruits; the added sugars found in many sugary treats aren’t good for the body, particularly when consumed in great quantities. Limit your daily intake to no more than 100 calories for women and 150 calories for men of these types of processed foods. Eating more than this amount can increase your risk of weight gain and high triglycerides. Diets high in added sugar are also more likely to lack the proper nutrition needed to maintain good health.

Dietary fats are essential to your health. They’re used by the body for growth as well as to prevent diseases, such as high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Certain fats are healthier than others, however, and all should be consumed with limits in mind. According to the American Heart Association, keep your dietary fat intake to no more than 25-35 percent of your daily caloric intake. Of this intake, stick with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Saturated fats should be kept to a minimum, making up no more than 7 percent of your daily caloric intake. Avoid trans fats.

Have a question? Email ealvarez@MiamiHerald.com or tweet @eddiemalvarez. To talk to the fitness trainers, email jandmfitness1@gmail.com.

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