The snake catcher: Biologist grabs pythons for study

 
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Nick Gadbois is one of several dozen hunters permitted by the State of Florida to hunt Burmese pythons. Unlike most other python hunters, who are mostly enthusiastic amateurs and herpetologists, Gadbois is a biologist by training and has participated in scientific studies in the Everglades.
Nick Gadbois is one of several dozen hunters permitted by the State of Florida to hunt Burmese pythons. Unlike most other python hunters, who are mostly enthusiastic amateurs and herpetologists, Gadbois is a biologist by training and has participated in scientific studies in the Everglades.
Nick Gadbois is one of several dozen hunters permitted by the State of Florida to hunt Burmese pythons. Unlike most other python hunters, who are mostly enthusiastic amateurs and herpetologists, Gadbois is a biologist by training and has participated in s

OCORRAL@EXPLICAMEDIA.COM

Nick Gadbois is one of several dozen hunters permitted by the state of Florida to hunt Burmese pythons. Unlike most other permitted python hunters, who are mostly enthusiastic amateurs and herpetologists, Gadbois is a biologist by training and has participated in scientific studies in the Everglades.

In this hunt, he snatches a lightning-fast black racer snake, a Florida native, to explain the difference between native snakes and Burmese Pythons.

One particular study Gadbois worked on showed that pythons were targeting bird rookeries and were capable of eating birds, their young and their eggs. He sometimes brings his catches home and shows his young son the snakes before turning them over to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conversation Commission, Gadbois said.

The snake-catchers’ tale is featured in the fourth installment of The Python Invasion project, outtakes from production shoots of a documentary featured on MiamiHerald.com. The documentary will broadcast on WPBT2 later in the year.

Oscar Corral is the founder and president of Explica Media, and the director and producer of The Python Invasion.

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