As Venezuela continues crushing dissent, a bipartisan push in Senate for sanctions

 

McClatchy Washington Bureau

The Obama administration said in a Senate hearing Thursday it was hesitant to use individual sanctions as a tactic in the Venezuelan political crisis, saying that doing so could escalate the situation into a fight between the Maduro regime and the United States rather than a struggle between that country’s people and their government.

In response, Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee sharply criticized the administration, indicating it was being far too timid in pushing back against the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro and its repressive tactics against political protesters.

Sen. Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, was among the sharpest critics, blasting officials from the State Department for failing to advocate for sanctions against individuals in Venezuela although sanctions have been used – and continue to be used – elsewhere.

Citing sanctions against individuals in Russia for that country’s actions in Ukraine, Rubio asked what the difference was between repressive officials there and those in Venezuela.

“We sanction human rights violators all the time,” Rubio said. “The only difference between those sanctions, those people, and others, is they spend their weekends in Miami.”

He spoke of people connected to the Venezuelan regime who live in Miami and “drive up and down the streets in their fancy cars. They laugh at you and they laugh at us, because they know they can get away with these things.”

Using sanctions against the Venezuelan officials will not cause them to be unified against the United States, because they already are, Rubio said.

“Let me give you a brief bulletin: They are already united against us,” Rubio said.

Rubio, Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., and others are backing legislation that would authorize sanctions to help mitigate the situation in Venezuela.

The criticism of the administration’s go-slow stance was bipartisan. Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., said the administration’s hesitancy on sanctions in the Venezuelan crisis could be applied to the use of sanctions in other places.

“I think you continue to make arguments against sanctions, and I have to ask you, ‘What’s your alternative?’” he said. “If we start with the premise that we can’t do anything that might affect the Venezuelan economy because it will hurt innocent people, we find ourselves at the end of the day saying, ‘Well, they’re just aren’t many sanctions’” the U.S. could use.

“If we’re not going to use military force, what are sanctions that might result in a positive outcome?” Durbin asked.

The administration, represented by Roberta Jacobson, assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs, stressed that the administration’s policy was to attempt to make sure the Venezuelan conflict didn’t escalate into a Maduro-vs.-U.S. dispute. Sanctions, while they can be effective some times, need to be used carefully, she said.

Asked Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.: “If we were going to nudge you along, how would you like to be nudged?”

“We think we don’t necessarily need the nudge,” Jacobson said. “We’re considering these things. We do think that right now they would be counterproductive.” She said sanctions would serve to reinforce a narrative of the Venezuelan government standing up to the United States – rather than the Venezuelan people standing up for themselves.

Added Tom Malinowski, another State Department official, on sanctions: “They work in some places, they don’t work everywhere. Timing is extremely important.”

But Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., responded that administrations often needed to be prodded by Congress to use sanctions.

“It’s sometimes a bit entertaining when administration witnesses come forward to talk about how tough various administrations have been on sanctions when by and large they have initiated with the Congress,” McCain said.

Since February, Venezuelans protesting the Maduro regime have been met with often brutal state-sanctioned violence. According to Rubio, “The government’s barbaric repression has resulted in at least 41 deaths that we know of, more than 2,519 detentions and at least 80 documented cases of torture.”

Several of these atrocities are being committed by the Venezuelan National Guard, Rubio said.

In a new report from Human Rights Watch, investigators found that the crackdown in Venezuela was widespread.

“These are not isolated incidents or the excesses of a few rogue actors,” Human Rights Watch’s Jose Miguel Vivanco told the Senate committee. The situation the group witnessed was “the worst we have seen in Venezuela in years,” he said.

The legislation Rubio and others introduced earlier this year – the Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014 – would authorize sanctions on persons involved in serious human rights violations against peaceful demonstrators in Venezuela, or those who have directed crackdowns on people exercising freedom of expression or assembly.

Email: cadams@mcclatchydc.com. Twitter: @CAdamsMcClatchy

Read more Venezuela stories from the Miami Herald

  • Venezuela's opposition coordinator resigns post

    The head of Venezuela's opposition alliance resigned Wednesday, delivering a blow to anti-government forces bitterly divided over how best to challenge socialist President Nicolas Maduro as frustrations rise with his handling of the struggling economy.

  •  
FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2014 file photo, surrounded by mask-wearing supporters of Venezuela's opposition, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, center, speaks to the media in Doral, Fla. Rubio and Gov. Rick Scott called for sanctions against Venezuela, as opponents of President Nicolas Maduro were staging countrywide protests. Amid escalating tensions with Venezuela, the U.S. State Department on Wednesday, July 30, 2014, announced sanctions against Venezuelan officials it said committed human rights abuses during the spring crackdown on anti-government protests.

    US imposes travel ban on some Venezuelan officials

    Amid escalating tensions with Venezuela, the U.S. State Department on Wednesday announced a travel ban for officials of the socialist government it said committed human rights abuses during a crackdown on opposition protests.

  •  
CORRECTS DATE TO 2014 Former Venezuelan general Hugo Carvajal arrives at the Queen Beatrix International Airport in Oranjestad, Aruba,  Sunday July 27, 2014 after being released by authorities. Carvajal was detained in Aruba on U.S. drug charges, released by the Dutch Caribbean island Sunday and sent home, authorities said Sunday.

    Official: Venezuela tried to pressure Aruba

    Aruba's top prosecutor said Tuesday that Venezuela ratcheted up various types of pressure against the Dutch Caribbean island and the Netherlands in recent days to try to win the release of a powerful former general wanted on U.S. drug-trafficking charges.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category