Miami Beach

New Miami Beach police chief gets $207,500 salary plus housing allowance — and an iPad

 

cveiga@MiamiHerald.com

Miami Beach’s new police chief will be one of the highest-paid employees in the city.

Commissioners on April 30 approved Dan Oates as the Beach’s police chief. Oates will be paid $207,500 in salary. His five-year contract includes other perks, including a $2,000 monthly housing allowance, city car and an iPad.

Oates replaces outgoing Chief Raymond Martinez, who announced his early retirement in March. He pulled a $191,000 salary.

Oates is a 34-year law enforcement veteran, having served the bulk of his career in New York. He was chief of the Aurora, Colo., police department at the time of a mass shooting in a movie theater there, which garnered world-wide attention.

When commissioners confirmed Oates as police chief at a meeting last month, City Manager Jimmy Morales said a quality police chief deserves a good contract.

“I think if you’re going to attract and bring, on a national level, a candidate of this caliber, then I think they deserve a contract that gives them some assurances. And we’re not a cheap city to live in,” Morales said. “And so I wanted to make sure that as he worked hard, he could have a good life in our community.”

According to his contract, Oates will get $2,000 a month to offset housing expenses. He is required to live in the city — and his contract provides him with up to $20,000 in one-time moving expenses.

Additionally, the chief gets to use a city car, for which the city pays all gas and other expenses, and $100 per pay period for his cell-phone bill. The city will also give Oates a notebook computer and an iPad.

The chief will get the same insurance as any other city employee, and the city will contribute up to $3,900 a year toward a deferred compensation retirement plan.

Other terms of Oates’ contract don’t boil down to dollars-and-cents. For example, a clause in his contract notes that Oates “may wish to reorganize the command staff” and he should be able to select “his own senior subordinates, which may be recruited from outside the ranks of the City of Miami Beach Police Department.” His contract also notes Oates will be allowed to assist in “outstanding legal matters” — including attending trial — relating to the movie theater shooting in Aurora.

Oates is entitled to a lump sum of 20-weeks’ salary if he is terminated, which is the maximum amount allowed under Florida law. He gets no payout, though, if the city determines there is good reason to dismiss him.

“The contract is fair and it’s commensurate with his background, his experience and what he brings to the table,” said Commissioner Michael Grieco.

As city manager, Jimmy Morales is the top administrator in Miami Beach. According to his contract, Morales makes $255,000 a year. His two-year contract includes $6,000 a year in vehicle expenses, and the city pays his full health and life insurance premiums.

Also among the highest paid employees is the city attorney, who pulls in a $227,000 salary.

Follow @Cveiga on Twitter.

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