Small Business Makeover

Small business makeover: Social media strategy boosts online furniture business’ chances for success

 

The makeover

The business: Heywood-Wakefield (www.Heywood-Wakefield.com), founded in 1897, is a historic furniture brand that closed its doors in the late 1970s. The company’s trademark was acquired by Miami entrepreneur Leonard Riforgiato in 1992. The business sells furniture that incorporates original Heywood-Wakefield designs and authentic vintage pieces dating back to the early 1900s.

The challenge: Getting a handle on the Web and social media presence, incorporating e-commerce, Facebook, Twitter and other tools to increase sales.

The experts: SCORE Miami-Dade counselor Orlando Espinosa, co-founder of Emineo Media, has over 25 years of experience in branding and social media. Rosi Arboleya, a consultant and creative director at Perpetual Message, a local marketing company, has over 30 years of experience working in the advertising and marketing space. Frank Padron is a consultant who specializes in digital marketing, online branding and SEO. He has over 20 years of experience working in digital and works with We Simplify the Internet (WSI), an Internet marketing firm in Coral Gables.

The makeover: In just a few weeks, a SCORE team developed a social media and online strategy for Riforgiato. They also walked him through the process of adding e-commerce functionality to his website so that people can buy Heywood-Wakefield furniture online. After Riforgiato implements the plan and completes the revamp of his website, they’ll meet with him again to gauge his progress and refine the strategies if needed.


About SCORE

Based in Washington, D.C., SCORE is a nonprofit with more than 12,000 volunteers working out of about 400 chapters around the country offering free counseling to small businesses. There are seven chapters on Florida’s east coast, including SCORE Miami-Dade, with more than 90 volunteer counselors.

Counselors from SCORE Miami-Dade meet with small business owners and offer free one-on-one counseling as well as dozens of low-cost workshops. To register or see more, click on “Local Workshops” on miami-dade.score.org.

To volunteer or learn more about SCORE, go to www.score.org or www.miamidade.score.org


How to apply for a makeover

Business Monday’s Small Business Makeover’s focus on a particular aspect of a business that needs help. Experts in the community will provide the advice. The makeover is open to full-time businesses in Miami-Dade or Broward counties open at least two years. Email your request to ndahlberg@MiamiHerald.com and put “Makeover” in the subject line.


Special to the Miami Herald

For Leonard Riforgiato, the path to small business ownership began in the 1990s with an abandoned company trademark and a passion for antiques.

After selling heirlooms and collectibles in storefronts around South Beach for decades, he turned his attention to Heywood-Wakefield, a vintage furniture brand his customers were buzzing about. Founded at the turn of the last century when two still-older furniture companies merged, Heywood-Wakefield incorporated unique designs and a creative use of bent wood to produce durable and stylish beds, chairs, night stands and other pieces designed for the home. Prices range from $540 for a bar stool to over $1,500 for a bed.

“I got interested in Heywood-Wakefield by accident,” Riforgiato said. “I noticed that, over the years, a lot of people came into my stores asking for vintage Heywood-Wakefield furniture.”

He researched the company, unearthing a trove of information. Heywood-Wakefield chairs and other now-iconic pieces had been made in Gardner, Mass., since 1897, continuing until the late 1970s. Gardner, with a population of 20,000, is the self-styled “Furniture Capital of New England”; in 1983, the Heywood-Wakefield Company Complex, where the well-known furniture was originally made, was added to the National Historic Register.

The company’s lineage impressed Riforgiato. “Once I found out the trademark had expired, I saw an opportunity to keep the brand alive,” he said. “I purchased it, kept the Heywood-Wakefield name and decided to go into the furniture business making these amazing pieces that people loved.”

That was back in 1992. Today, nearly 22 years later, Riforgiato no longer sells Heywood-Wakefield furniture in showrooms, instead operating solely online from his home in Miami. “The cost of operating a showroom became quite high over the years,” he said. “Real-estate costs were going through the roof, so I decided to use the power of the Internet to grow the business without having a brick-and-mortar building to show the furniture.”

Riforgiato was so passionate about the company’s history that he continued to produce Heywood-Wakefield furniture in Massachusetts. He began production in Gardner in 1992, but in 2011, he moved to a factory in nearby Winchendon.

With annual revenue of nearly a quarter of a million dollars, Riforgiato estimates that his company sells over 200 pieces of furniture per year. Relying heavily on client referrals to drive sales, he spends more time making furniture than he does on marketing it. He wanted to take the offline conversations his customers were having and bring them online in hopes of increasing sales.

To find answers, Heywood-Wakefield turned to the Miami Herald for a Small Business Makeover to help him figure out how to best incorporate tools like social media and a revamped website into a growth plan. The Herald, in turn, brought in Miami SCORE, a nonprofit organization of volunteers who have been successful entrepreneurs. SCORE volunteers use their business acumen and provide mentoring services to small business owners free of charge, putting them on the road to success. SCORE identified three counselors to turn Heywood-Wakefield’s online marketing around.

The SCORE team included Orlando Espinosa, co-founder of Emineo Media, who has over 25 years of experience in branding and social media. He has also led training programs for entrepreneurs both in the U.S. and abroad. Rosi Arboleya, a consultant and creative director at Perpetual Message, a local marketing company, has over 30 years of experience working in the advertising and marketing space. Her expertise is in Web development, social media and developing online marketing campaigns. Frank Padron is a consultant who specializes in digital marketing, online branding and SEO. He has over 20 years of experience working in digital and works with We Simplify the Internet (WSI), an Internet marketing firm in Coral Gables.

After the first of three meetings with Riforgiato, the counselors identified several issues with Heywood-Wakefield’s marketing strategy. One of the company’s immediate problems was a lack of exposure on social media. Another factor impeding sales was the company’s website. It wasn’t very user-friendly and couldn’t handle e-commerce, so customers weren’t able to buy Heywood-Wakefield furniture online. Heywood-Wakefield wanted to take the online plunge, but with a limited marketing budget of just a couple thousand dollars and orders to fill, it seemed daunting.

“Many times, small business owners are so busy running all aspects of their companies that they tend to place a low priority on things they don’t know about,” Espinosa said. “So, suddenly things that seem important to company sales like social media and online marketing are put on the back burner because the company is unsure about how to approach it.”

The counselors all agreed that by incorporating social media and a few tweaks to his current website, Riforgiato could see a significant increase in annual sales. To accomplish that goal, the SCORE team had the following advice:

•  Revamp the website

“It’s time for Heywood-Wakefield to step it up a notch in terms of its online presence,” Espinosa said. “First and foremost, the homepage needs a redo.”

For quick recognition and brand reinforcement, Espinosa recommended the Heywood-Wakefield company logo should be placed on top left of page. “The company logo was in the footer of the site way at the bottom,” Espinosa said. “But it really should be at the top. It should be one of the first things a customer sees when they log on to your site.”

Next, Espinosa suggested adding social media buttons for Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and others on the top right-hand side of the page for easy access. “Heywood-Wakefield does have a Facebook page,” Espinosa said. “But you can’t find it from the website. Adding social media buttons to the right of the page will make it easy for customers to connect with the brand online.”

Arboleya reminded Heywood-Wakefield that incorporating better photos into the site would increase customer engagement and time spent on the site. She recommended that Heywood-Wakefield replace static images with a product slideshow. “Heywood-Wakefield has beautiful furniture that is really compelling visually,” Arboleya said. “They need to showcase that through animated slideshows that get the customer interested as soon as they log on.”

Padron encouraged the company to track its customer engagement online using analytics. Using information gathered through analytics, Heywood-Wakefield will be able to build a long-term online marketing strategy that works. “Google Analytics provides insights into campaigns,” Padron said. “And it helps you analyze visitor traffic. Heywood-Wakefield needs to find out if analytics are on their current site.”

The SCORE team recommended using Wordpress for the new website. “For easy updating, SEO and content management, WordPress sites are best,” Padron said. “With Wordpress, you get the control to make quick do-it-yourself updates easily.” The team also encouraged Heywood-Wakefield to add e-commerce to their website. “The ability to make a purchase online would be a game-changer for the company,” Espinosa said. “Right now, when customers are ready to make a purchase, they have to call Heywood-Wakefield and go through the transaction with a live person.”

•  Create a blog

Because of Heywood-Wakefield’s rich history, engaging customers by posting about how the company started, where it is now and where it’s going can provide great content for a blog. “A blog for this company could be a really fun thing,” Arboleya said. “The company can post tidbits about its history, pictures of vintage pieces and share videos on a blog written by Mr. Riforgiato. He is the man behind the brand, and a blog is a great way to introduce him to the world.” The SCORE team also recommended that Heywood-Wakefield share information on industry-specific websites and forums with a link back to the blog. “Blogs are also a great way of generating interest in the latest design trend or product,” Espinosa said. “Use it to incorporate content with Facebook and email marketing. It’s also perfect for cross promoting with blog sites such as Retro Renovations.”

•  Develop branded e-blasts

Heywood-Wakefield doesn’t have a regular form of e-communication with clients. The SCORE counselors recommend that Heywood-Wakefield consider developing a branded e-blast that can be distributed weekly or monthly. “Like any business, Heywood-Wakefield wants to be top of mind for your customers,” Arboleya said. “Reaching out to them with things that can make their lives better like a sale, an interesting bit of history or even a new slideshow of pictures is a good way to stay in touch.” Espinosa said not to send e-mails too often, such as daily, and to use creative subject lines.

•  Embrace social media

The SCORE team urged Heywood-Wakefield to get up to speed on social media. “It’s a low-cost and effective way to market,” Espinosa said. “It’s also one of the best ways out there to reach your customer one-on-one.” Espinosa recommended that Heywood-Wakefield spruce up its Facebook page, while Arboleya emphasized the importance of posting new content regularly to keep customers coming back. “Connect with other Facebook Groups and page administrators with the same passion for design and vintage furniture,” Arboleya said. “Establish a dialogue; these groups already have a built-in audience, so go ahead and share.”

The team also counseled Heywood-Wakefield to use Twitter and Instagram. Riforgiato said he would try to focus more effort on posting regularly to Facebook and Twitter to start, with Instagram to follow soon after.

•  Update Wikipedia

Heywood-Wakefield is one of the few small businesses that has a Wikipedia page. The SCORE counselors recommended that the company history on it be updated, and that links to the company website be added. “It’s amazing that the company has a Wikipedia page,” Espinosa said. “That almost never happens. This demonstrates that people out there think that Heywood-Wakefield is noteworthy. The company should capitalize on this and make sure the facts on the page are current without adding anything that might seem like advertising.”

•  Evaluate results

Once Heywood-Wakefield implements the SCORE team’s recommendations, they advised the company to measure results. “You can get a full picture of whether an online strategy is working in about 90 days, so monitoring progress monthly is important,” Espinosa said. “Analytics are also essential,” Padron said. “Both traditional websites and social media sites like Facebook and Twitter have analytics and tracking to help gauge the effectiveness of a company’s online marketing efforts.”

Riforgiato said the process of working with SCORE counselors on a makeover was eye-opening. “I didn’t quite realize just how far behind the company was when it came to social media and e-commerce,” he said. “And to tell you the truth, I never really understood how social media could help, but through this experience, I got a real education and I look forward to using what I have learned as a result to grow the business.”

By the third meeting with the SCORE counselors, Riforgiato was already enthusiastically taking their advice — posting more frequently on social media, starting the revamp of his website and looking into updating the Heywood-Wakefield Wikipedia page. “The SCORE counselors were great,” he said. “I intend to use everything they’ve taught me to increase revenue for my business over the next three months.”

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